July 3 Energy News

July 3, 2019

Opinion:

¶ “Four Reasons Renewables Will Continue To Dominate Fossil Fuels” • Renewables will dominate energy markets in the US because of their economics, even without the support of policy, some analysts agree. To start with, as renewables gain more market share, fossil fuels are displaced, driving up their per-unit costs. But there is more. [Forbes]

Energy (Christophe Gateau | picture alliance via Getty Images)

¶ “Rural America Could Power A Renewable Economy – But First We Need To Solve Coal Debt” • Despite falling prices for wind and solar projects, the electric cooperatives that power most of rural America remain particularly reliant on coal. This is in part because of billions of dollars in debt on increasingly uneconomic coal plants. [Clean Cooperative]

¶ “Coal-Fired Power Plants Just Had Their Worst Month In Decades” • According to the latest data from the US Energy Information Administration, coal-fired power plants produced just over 60,000 GWh of electricity in April 2019, about 20% of demand and the lowest level in decades. But it wasn’t the only first for the country’s energy grid. [Motley Fool]

Coal train (Getty Images)

Science and Technology:

¶ “NASA Warns ‘Rapid Melting’ Of Glaciers Has DOUBLED” • Climate change and global warming have “doubled” the rates at which Himalayan glaciers are rapidly melting, space agency NASA has shockingly claimed. With  temperatures continuing to rise unchecked, up to 75% of the Himalayan glaciers will be gone by the year 2100. [Express.co.uk]

World:

¶ “Angry Citizens Sue Indonesian Government Over Growing Air Pollution” • Fed up about worsening air pollution in the capital of Indonesia, a group of Jakarta residents is suing the country’s president and other officials. Ayu Eza Tiara, one of the lawyers working on the case, said that 31 people had joined the lawsuit in the past week. [CNN]

Jakarta pollution (Bay Ismoyo | AFP | Getty Images)

¶ “Last Month Broke The Record For Hottest June Ever In Europe And Around The World” • Will this be a summer for the history books? Average global temperatures were the hottest on record last month, ranging about 0.10°C (or 0.18°F) higher than that of the previous record-holder, the Copernicus Climate Change Service reported. [CNN]

¶ “Gujarat Targeting 30 GW Renewable Capacity By 2022” • The government of Gujarat announced plans to increase its target for power generation capacity from renewable sources to touch or surpass 30 GW by 2022. The Finance Minister said the capacity of renewable energy in Gujarat was 4,126 MW in 2013, and has risen to 8,885 MW. [Saurenergy]

Solar energy

¶ “Vestas Finishes Q2 With Trademark Flurry Of Activity And 40% Bump In Orders” • Danish wind energy giant Vestas Wind Systems A/S finished the second quarter of 2019 with a flurry of activity, announcing 1,775 MW of wind turbine orders in its last four days. For the first half of 2019, orders were up 40% over the same period in 2018. [CleanTechnica]

US:

¶ “Houston Ranks Number One In America In Renewable Energy Use” • The City of Houston, long associated with oil, sources a whopping 92% of its power from wind and solar energy. According to a February EPA report, that impressive percentage ranks it higher in renewable energy use than any other city government in the US. [PaperCity Magazine]

Wind turbines

¶ “Chubb Becomes First US Insurer To Reduce Exposure To Coal” • Chubb Ltd, an insurance provider based in New Jersey, has announced that it will no longer underwrite the construction and operation of new coal-fired power plants or new risks for companies that generate more than 30% of their revenue from coal. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “UPM Raflatac Buys 100% Renewable Power For Factory In North Carolina” • UPM Raflatac Inc, a maker of pressure sensitive label materials, said its factory in Mills River, North Carolina, is now running on 100% renewable power. The Mills River factory will get its electric energy under Duke Energy’s NC Renewable Energy Program. [Renewables Now]

Duke Energy solar park (Duke Energy image)

¶ “Greenbelt Resources, New Age Renewable Energy To Produce Bioethanol From Dairy Waste” • NARE, based in New York, has developed technology to convert waste, including acid whey and other milk derivatives, into bio-ethanol and protein concentrate. Greenbelt Resources collaborated with NARE to upscale the technology. [Biofuels International Magazine]

¶ “Duke Energy Passes 1 GW Of Owned Solar Energy Capacity” • With the North Rosamond Solar Facility coming online last month in California, Duke Energy has passed the 1-GW threshold of utility-scale owned and operated solar facilities nationwide. Duke Energy’s solar portfolio that now has a total capacity of 1.1 GW. [Renewable Energy Magazine]

Solar technicians (Duke Energy image)

¶ “Tennessee Valley Authority Plans For Up To 14 GW Of Solar By 2038” • The Tennessee Valley Authority expects to add up to 14 GW of solar and 5 GW of energy storage over the next 20 years, a massive new clean energy addition to its current electric generation mix, which is largely based on hydropower, coal, and nuclear power.  [Greentech Media]

¶ “States Stick Ratepayers With $15 Billion To Rescue Nukes” • In the past three years, state governments have forced more than $14 billion in nuclear bailouts onto electricity customers – and counting. Ohio’s subsidy plan has stalled, but it may be restarted. And the plan to support Connecticut’s Milford plant would also be added. [Environmental Working Group]

Have a gracefully composed day.

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