March 29 Energy News

March 29, 2019

Opinion:

¶ “The Young Minds Solving Climate Change” • People of the younger generations understand that there are solutions to the problems of climate change. “The climate crisis has already been solved. We already have all the facts and solutions. All we have to do is to wake up and change,” said Nobel Prize nominee Greta Thunberg. [BBC]

Waterfall in the Amazon rain forest (Getty Images)

¶ “Perry’s Approval Of Secret Authorizations For Saudi Nuclear Deal Makes Experts Nervous” • Six secret authorizations have been approved by US DOE Secretary Rick Perry for companies to sell nuclear energy technology to Saudi Arabia. But Saudi Arabia has not signed any agreement not to use enriched materials to build weapons. [ThinkProgress]

World:

¶ “After Cyclone Idai, Climate Chief Warns Of More Extreme Weather” • Extreme weather events, such as Cyclone Idai, are becoming more frequent due to climate change and will intensify if countries do not take urgent action to curb global warming, the UN secretary general warned. “No country or community is immune.” [CNN]

Flooding in Mozambique after Cyclone Idai

¶ “Soaring Electric Car Sales Around The World” • Plug-in vehicles had a banner year in 2018. Global sales totaled 2.1 million units, a 64% increase from 2017. As a share of the overall light vehicle market, cars with plugs reached 2.2% for the year, and an impressive 3.8% for the month of December, according to EV-Volumes.com. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “Copenhagen Way Ahead Of Official Plans – Electric Buses To Enter Operation 6 Years Early” • The media outlet TV2 Lorry reports that the citizen representation of the municipality of Copenhagen has approved phasing out all diesel buses in the city before the end of 2025, starting with the budget of 2019. This is six years ahead of schedule. [CleanTechnica]

Electric bus in Copenhagen (Leif Jørgensen, Creative Commons)

¶ “It Took Just Two Summers For Renewables To Replace Hazelwood” • For CO₂ pollution, Hazelwood was the worst coal power station in Australia, but it was very important for power supplies. The AEMO said it would take eight years to replace it with a coal plant. But it took two summers to replace it with wind and solar. [RenewEconomy]

¶ “New Wind Farm To Be New Zealand’s First Large-Scale Generation Since 2014” • New Zealand electric utility Mercury will develop the country’s first large-scale generation capacity addition since 2014 with a 119-MW wind farm to be built in the south of the North Island. It has been in the development pipeline for 15 years. [RenewEconomy]

New Zealand wind energy

¶ “City Of Sydney To Go 100% Renewable For Electricity” • In a decision endorsed by Council this week, the City of Sydney has committed to using 100% renewable energy sources to meet its electricity needs. The City has already installed solar panels on dozens of its buildings and reduced electric consumption by 26% since 2006. [Solar Quotes]

¶ “Vestas Feeds Subsidy-Free First In Denmark” • Vestas has won a turbine order totalling 17-MW from Hirtshals Havnefond for Denmark’s first utility-scale subsidy-free wind farm. The project, which will be located on the waterfront in the Port of Hirtshals in the northwestern part of the country, will feature four V136-4.2MW machines. [reNEWS]

Vestas V136-4.2MW (Vestas image)

US:

¶ “‘I Know A Lot About Wind,’ Trump Says. A Government FAQ Proves He Doesn’t” • “If it doesn’t blow, you can forget about television for that night,” Trump said, adding, “I know a lot about wind.” But the DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy says that the power grid is capable of handling variations of wind energy. [USA TODAY]

¶ “Corporate Giants Form Alliance To Buy Renewable Energy” • Some of the top manufacturers in the US, consumer companies, and high technology firms are launching Renewable Energy Buyers Alliance. The trade organization is expected to create a boom in renewable energy purchases throughout corporate America. [Kallanish Energy]

Solar collectors in California (Wikimedia Commons)

¶ “Energy Industry Says NH Could Soon See Offshore Wind, Modernized Grid, More EV Chargers” • Energy industry players have announced big plans for the future of New Hampshire’s electric grid, including offshore wind. This came even as some progressive energy ideas continue to stir controversy in state government. [New Hampshire Public Radio]

¶ “Tucson Electric Power To Double Its Renewable Energy Output With New Mexico Wind Project” • Tucson Electric Power is building its biggest renewable-energy project yet. It is the massive Oso Grande Wind Project in southeastern New Mexico, which will help the company more than double its generation of renewable energy by 2021. [Arizona Daily Star]

New Mexico wind turbines (AE Araiza | Arizona Daily Star)

¶ “DTE Speeds Move To Renewable Energy: What It Means For Customers” • DTE Energy CEO Gerry Anderson announced a more aggressive schedule for the Detroit-based power company to reduce its carbon output and rely more on renewable energy sources including wind and solar. DTE will close its coal-burning plants early. [Detroit Free Press]

¶ “Florida Charges Ahead With 400-MW Mega-Battery” • Florida Power & Light is building the world’s largest solar-powered battery, four times the capacity of the world’s largest operating battery in South Australia. The 409-MW facility, to be commissioned in late 2021, will be charged by an existing FPL PV plant in Manatee County. [reNEWS]

Have a marvelously superior day.

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