Archive for March 22nd, 2019

March 22 Energy News

March 22, 2019

Opinion:

¶ “A New Energy Future For Puerto Rico Beyond Recovery” • The people of Puerto Rico have an opportunity to build a new type of energy system. They can build one that better protects residents from future super storms, improves the quality of life for everyone, and supports the island’s economy for decades to come. [Environmental Defense Fund]

Yauco, Puerto Rico

Science and Technology:

¶ “New Report Warns Of Dangers To Great Lakes Health And Economy From Climate Change” • A new report provides an updated and detailed picture for how climate change is affecting this crucial source of freshwater and, therefore, threatening public health, infrastructure, fish and wildlife, and the regional economy. [Phys.Org]

¶ “Wind Turbines Make Better Neighbors Than Power Plants” • People living near wind projects strongly prefer their spinning, clean power-producing neighbors over plants that generate electricity from fossil fuels, nuclear, or even solar, a study published in Nature Energy shows. And that is even true in states that produce coal. [Anthropoce]

Homes and turbines

World:

¶ “Load Shedding: City of Cape Town wants To Purchase Power From IPPs” • Cape Town’s mayor revived plans to take South Africa’s department of energy to court, after the recent spate of load shedding. The city is trying to have power distribution taken away from utility Eskom and handed over to independent power producers. [The South African]

¶ “Study: Fossil Fuel Generation Has No Business Case In Australia” • A study published by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation and the Australian Energy Market Operator, found solar and wind are the cheapest forms of power even after storage and balancing costs were taken into account. [Greentech Media]

Coal-burning power plant (Loy Yang, Shutterstock)

¶ “ExxonMobil Faces EU Parliament Ban After No-Show At Climate Hearing” • ExxonMobil faces losing its lobby privileges at the European parliament after it failed to show up for the first hearing into climate change denial. Previously, only Monsanto has ever lost access to European MPs, parliamentary meetings, and digital resources. [The Guardian]

¶ “Energy Giants Spent $1 Billion On Climate Lobbying, PR Since Paris: Watchdog” • The five largest publicly listed oil and gas majors have spent $1 billion since the 2015 Paris climate deal on public relations or lobbying that is “overwhelmingly in conflict” with the landmark accord’s goals, a transparency watchdog said. [RTL Today]

Oil rig (RTL file photo | © AFP)

US:

¶ “Ford Announces Plans To Build Electric And Autonomous Cars In Michigan” • Ford announced it will invest $850 million to prepare its iconic Flat Rock assembly plant for building battery electric cars. And the company says it will spend an additional $50 million to equip that factory to manufacture autonomous vehicles. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “Missouri Regulators Approve $2.3 Billion Grain Belt Express Transmission Line, But Fight Not Over” • Missouri regulators unanimously approved the controversial Grain Belt Express high voltage DC transmission line, designed to move 4 GW of wind energy from western Kansas to states to the east. Opponents say they will appeal. [Utility Dive]

Transmission lines

¶ “ISO NE Reports On Electric Reliability And The Future Of A Hybrid System” • ISO New England, the region’s grid operator, published its 2019 Regional Electricity Outlook, an annual report looking at the trends and challenges affecting its power system. The report shows changing grid demands with new renewables and efficiency. [Vermont Biz]

¶ “TVA Shapes Long-Range Power Plan To Boost Solar, Cut Coal In Next 20 Years” • The Tennessee Valley Authority and its customers will be getting a bigger share of power in the future from the sky than from under ground, under proposals included in a new long-range power plan being prepared by the federal utility. [Chattanooga Times Free Press]

Solar farm (Thomas R Machnitzki, Wikimedia Commons)

¶ “Donald Trump’s Solar And Wind Power Criticism Slammed By Scientists: ‘Trump Is A Dangerous, Evil Clown’” • Scientists have responded angrily to President Donald Trump’s anti-renewable energy claims. One example is that people would have to turn off their TV sets if there wasn’t enough wind to power turbines. [Newsweek]

¶ “US Solar And Wind Firms Call The ‘Green New Deal’ Too Extreme” • Representatives of America’s clean energy companies are withholding their support for the climate-fighting plan, calling it unrealistic and too politically divisive. The solar and wind industries are keen to grow their businesses in both red and blue states. [Thomson Reuters Foundation]

US solar array

¶ “Two Pennsylvania Townships Announce 100% Renewable Energy Goals” • In Pennsylvania, both Schuylkill Township and Whitemarsh Township approved resolutions to transition to 100% renewable energy. Both aim to use 100% renewable sources for electricity by 2035 and for heating and transportation by 2050, the Sierra Club said. [Solar Industry]

¶ “US Nuclear Is Dying, But It Produced More Electricity In 2018 Than Ever Before” • The Energy Information Administration says the US nuclear fleet produced 807.1 TWh of electricity, barely beating its 2010 record peak of 807 TWh. But the US nuclear industry has been in a well-documented decline. So what gives? [Ars Technica]

Have an absolutely flawless day.

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