October 11 Energy News

October 11, 2018

Science and Technology:

¶ “Freakishly Warm Ocean Water is a Major Reason why Hurricane Michael Became the Strongest Storm in Decades” • Based on its low central pressure, Michael is the most powerful hurricane the US has weathered in nearly 50 years. It grew from a tropical depression in just 72 hours over waters that were 4°F to 7°F (2.2°C to 3.8°C) normal. [Business Insider]

Wreckage from Hurricane Michael (Photo: Gerald Herbert | AP)

World:

¶ “Science Needs to Fix Climate Change – and FAST Warns Astronomer Royal after IPCC Report” • Britain’s Astronomer Royal has called for a worldwide redoubling of research and development into renewable energy to avert ecological catastrophe. He sees solving the climate problem as a “win-win situation. [Express.co.uk]

¶ “Norwegians Float with SeaTwirl” • Swedish outfit SeaTwirl is to sell electricity to Norwegian power company Haugaland Kraft from its S2 floating wind turbine, if the project is built at a site near Haugesund in Norway. SeaTwirl said that the Haugesund site is one of the main alternatives for the installation of the 1-MW S2. [reNEWS]

Impression of SeaTwirl (SeaTwirl image)

¶ “Denmark is Banning Non-Renewable Energy Power Vehicles to Combat Climate Change” • Denmark becomes the latest country in the entire world to ban the new sale of vehicles powered entirely by fossil fuels in order to fully transition to clean power, non-polluting vehicles on the road such as EVs or hybrids. [College Media Network]

¶ “The Philippines Seeking to Rev Up Geothermal Development Again” • The Philippines is looking at revamping geothermal development again, following its drop behind Indonesia in global rankings of geothermal countries earlier this year. In recent years, the Philippines has been basing its economic growth on fossil fuels. [ThinkGeoEnergy]

Makban geothermal plant (ThinkGeoEnergy, creative commons)

¶ “Fossil Fuel Power Drops to New Low in UK” • A report by energy market analyst EnAppSys shows that coal and gas-fired power stations in the UK produced 26.71 TWh in the three months to September 30 – just 41% of Britain’s overall power mix. Five years ago, the level for Q3 was 60%, and in 2010 it was 74%. [Power Engineering International]

¶ “Governments Must Change Tack to Contain Global Warming, Says Big Oil” • To contain global warming at 1.5°C, the IPCC said manmade global net CO2 emissions need to fall by about 45% by 2030 from 2010 levels. Governments, not energy firms, need to take the lead to reach that target, several of the big oil and gas companies indicated. [Business Insider]

Cars in Berlin (Thomas Reuters image)

¶ “World Bank Dumps Kosovo Plant, Ending Support for Coal Worldwide” • The World Bank has abandoned the last coal project on its books, with its president publicly dumping the Kosova e Re plant in Kosovo. The coal-burning power plant could not compete with renewables on price, according to bank president Jim Yong Kim. [businessgreen.com]

¶ “Belgium’s Creaky Nuclear Reactors Raise Risk of Winter Power Outages” • Five of Belgium’s seven nuclear reactors have been taken offline for repairs in recent months, with another set to follow, after the discovery of shoddy concrete, leaky pipelines and poorly constructed steel supports. Belgium plans to close all the plants by 2025. [Taiwan News]

Nuclear Plant in the back yard of a windmill

US:

¶ “Why Exxon is Spending $1 Million to Push for a Carbon Tax” • ExxonMobil, long accused of downplaying the threat of climate change, announced plans to donate $1 million to a group urging Washington to enact a tax on carbon. It is the first donation Americans for Carbon Dividends has got from an American oil and gas supermajor. [CNN]

¶ “Ørsted Acquires Deepwater Wind to Build US Offshore Wind Platform” Danish offshore wind energy giant Ørsted signed an agreement to acquire Deepwater Wind, the developer of the 30-MW Block Island wind farm off Rhode Island, in a move set to be worth $510 million. This will result in the creation of an offshore wind platform for the US. [CleanTechnica]

Block Island wind farm

¶ “Tesla May Double Size of Gigafactory 1 and Triple its Workforce, if Infrastructure Permits” • Elon said he can foresee doubling the size of Gigafactory 1 and tripling the workforce of 7,000 to over 20,000, a Reno Review Journal report said. “The biggest constraint on growth here is housing and infrastructure,” Musk said. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “Hawaii’s March to 100% Adds 260 MW Solar + 1 GWh Storage” • Hawaiian Electric Industries reports that it is in negotiations on long term power purchase agreements with developers of seven projects on three islands. The developments, on O‘ahu, Maui, and the island of Hawai‘i, are for solar power with battery backup, at a 1:4 capacity ratio. [pv magazine USA]

Kauai Island Utility Cooperative solar plus storage plant

¶ “Pika Energy Storage Unveils its Upgradable Residential Energy Storage Solution” • Pika Energy has rolled out two new residential energy storage products that bring a new capability to allow Pika’s Smart Batteries to be integrated into existing solar systems. The system is one of the first designed to work with existing systems. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “Duke Energy Plans $500 Million Investment in Energy Storage” • Duke Energy, headquartered in Charlotte, North Carolina, has outlined plans for $500 million of energy storage projects to be carried out in the Carolinas over the next 15 years. The systems are expected to have a capacity of approximately 300 MW. [Renewable Energy Magazine]

Have an energizingly encouraging day.

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