August 9 Energy News

August 9, 2018

Opinion:

¶ “You probably have no idea just how much water is needed to produce electricity” • Despite the growth of renewable-energy, most electricity is still generated by fossil fuel or nuclear fuel. The trouble is that thermal electricity generation, a category that includes coal, natural gas, and nuclear power, does not just require fuel, but also a lot of water. [Quartz]

Thermal power plant (Photo: Yves Herman | Reuters)

¶ “What Are Coastal Nuclear Power Plants Doing to Address Climate Threats?” • By the time the $25 billion Hinkley Point C nuclear station is finished, possibly in 2028, the concrete seawall will be enough, the UK regulator and French engineers say, to withstand the strongest storm surge, the greatest tsunami and the highest sea-level rise. But will it? [Ensia]

¶ “US Wind Industry ‘Full Steam Ahead’ Despite Wind Catcher Cancellation” • It’s American Wind Week, and the U.S. wind industry has a lot to celebrate. Wind power has become the country’s largest source of renewable energy capacity. Today, the industry employs more than 105,000 U.S. workers and is building more power than ever before. [Greentech Media]

Invenergy wind farm (Photo:Invenergy)

World:

¶ “$20 Billion Pledged For Middle Eastern Energy Projects By Chinese President” • Loans of $20 billion and $1.6 billion in financial aid was recently pledged by Chinese President Xi Jinping to countries in the Middle East to help boost economic growth. The aid will be used for projects involving oil and gas, nuclear power, and clean energy.

 [CleanTechnica]

¶ “Newest Solar Tenders In Egypt Come In Under 3 Cents Per kWh” • The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development is leading a campaign to bring 1.4 GW of solar power to Egypt. One of the 16 proposed projects is the 200-MW Kom Ombo. The bid from Fotowatio Renewable Ventures was the lowest, at just under 2.8¢/kWh. [CleanTechnica]

Egyptian solar array (Credit: Complete Energy Solutions)

¶ “TRIG profit surges 51%” • The Renewables Infrastructure Group saw its pre-tax profit increase 51% to £47.3 million in the first half of 2018, up from £31.3 million in the same period of last year. The company said its results were boosted by higher than expected power prices and increased output, which helped offset slower wind speeds. [reNews]

¶ “Eon green earnings grow” • Eon reported adjusted earnings from renewables up 15% to €236 million in the first six months of 2018, from €205 million last year. The German company said the growth was due to increased output came despite unfavourable wind conditions, as a result of newly commissioned onshore and offshore wind farms. [reNews]

Humber Gateway offshore wind farm (Eon image)

¶ “UK government to review role of wind, solar, links in capacity market” • The UK government has opened a review of the Capacity Market to ensure the policy remains fit for purpose five years after introduction. Participation of wind and solar could increase competition, auction liquidity and value for money for consumers. [S&P Global Platts]

¶ “Dairy giant to power cheese plant with 100% renewable energy” • Dairy manufacturer Dale Farm, based in Northern Ireland, has announced that it is now running one of its cheese manufacturing plants with 100% renewable energy after bringing its own solar farm online earlier this month. The 5-MW solar plant is co-located with a cheese plant. [edie.net]

Solar farm at the cheese facility (Photo: Brian Morrison)

US:

¶ “If You Blinked, You Missed The Big Offshore Wind News – Almost!” • The mighty offshore wind energy beast of the USA is finally beginning to stir, just in time to celebrate American Wind Week. The White House has been notably silent on American Wind Week so far, but the DOE has been filling in the gaps with some vigorous shout-outs. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “Illinois solar program continues to develop, solar job numbers begin to grow” • The Illinois Power Agency made more moves toward full operation of solar programs under the Future Energy Jobs Act by launching the Adjustable Block Program website for potential vendors of PV systems. The site will be open for vendor registration in November. [pv magazine USA]

Solar installation (Photo: Cadmus Group)

¶ “Solar With Storage Surges as Gas Falls” • Solar-with-storage projects are surging in many states by beating gas plants on economics and reliability. By 2026, the US is expected to add storage capacity equal to 35 nuclear plants, generating $4 billion in annual savings. Some big utilities are already replacing gas facilities with batteries. [Common Dreams]

¶ “Largo, Florida, Commits To 100% Clean Energy” • The city commission of Largo, Florida, approved the city’s commitment to transition to 100% clean, renewable energy. Largo, which is located in the Tampa Bay Area, represents the fourth city in Florida and the 75th in the U.S. to establish this goal, according to the Sierra Club. [Solar Industry]

Trees in Florida

¶ “Kewaunee farm breaks ground on renewable energy project” • A dairy farm in Wisconsin is turning waste into energy. Pagel’s Ponderosa Dairy broke ground on a project that will create renewable natural gas from dairy cow manure. It is the second anaerobic digester in the country whose product will refined to fuel vehicles. [Fox11online.com]

¶ “Costs For Vogtle Nuclear Expansion Jump By $1.1 Billion” • The expansion at the Vogtle nuclear plant, already years late and billions over budget, will cost an additional $1.1 billion. In their second quarter 2018 earnings call, company officials told investors the estimated cost to complete the project increased from $7.3 billion to $8.4 billion. [WABE 90.1 FM]

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