March 28 Energy News

March 28, 2020

Opinion:

¶ “The Coronavirus Is a Fast-Motion Climate Crisis” • We were told that “everything was under control” or that the worry was nothing more than “a hoax.” Instead of acting competent, the president has tried to lie, bluster, and bluff his way through the threat. The mishandling of the coronavirus has terrifying parallels to the climate crisis. [Rolling Stone]

Protesters (Erik McGregor | LightRocket via Getty Images)

¶ “Oil Price Volatility Will Give A Boost To Renewables” • You might think that a low oil price is good news sales of fuel-burning electricity generators, but that may not be true. The financing that makes building new facilities possible relies on stable prices during the term of the loans. So the growth of renewables is not related to the price of oil. [CleanTechnica]

Science and Technology:

¶ “How Madagascar Shapes Southern Africa’s Rainfall: Climate Modeller Adds Puzzle Piece” • An analysis of how Madagascar influences the flow of air over the ocean – and therefore the formation of clouds and rainfall – will help climate scientists make more accurate forecasts of the likely changes in future rainfall patterns in the region. [Climate Home]

Madagascar baobab trees (Aleix Cabarrocas Garcia | Flickr)

¶ “The Hidden Impact Of Your Daily Water Use” • The way we do our laundry, clean our dishes, and hose down our cars all has a surprising and largely unnoticed impact on the climate. The power needed to run household appliances, and especially the energy required to heat up water, has a carbon footprint that’s largely invisible to householders. [BBC]

World:

¶ “Volvo Moves To Rail Transport To Reduce Carbon Emissions” • Volvo is just one of the many companies switching from over-the-road trucks to rail transport to move cars from its factories to storage depots across Europe, China, and the US. The switch to rail reduced CO₂ emissions by nearly 75% (!) on one European delivery route. [CleanTechnica]

Car on a train (Image: Volvo Cars)

¶ “UK Power: Renewables And Gas Up, Nukes And Coal Down” • Overall UK electricity production was 323.7 TWh, a drop of 2.8 % from 2018. Renewable sector output rose 8%. Coal’s retreat continued, dropping from 5.1% of the overall generation mix in 2018 to 2.1% in 2019. Nuclear outages curtailed output, down from 19.5% to 17.5%. [The Energyst]

¶ “SECI, NTPC Sign Agreement To Build Two Solar Energy Parks Of 5,000 MW Capacity Each In Rajasthan” • Solar Energy Corporation of India and National Thermal Power Corporation have signed an agreement with the Government of Rajasthan to set up two mega 5,000 MW renewable energy parks, according to Hindu Businessline. [Swarajya]

Solar panels (Allison Joyce | Getty Images)

¶ “Power, Coal, Renewable Energy Exempted From Lockdown” • The government of India has exempted movement of personnel and equipment related to power generation and transmission from its country-wide coronavirus lockdown, according to separate notifications released by the Union ministries of power and renewable energy. [EnergyInfraPost]

¶ “COVID-19: Siemens Gamesa Pauses Production At Hull” • Siemens Gamesa has paused production at its blade factory in Hull, east England, in light of new government guidelines in response to the coronavirus. The company said that it has been reviewing operations daily because of the COVID-19 outbreak and changes in policy. [reNEWS]

Loading wind turbine blade (Ørsted image)

¶ “Renewables Set To Win During China’s COVID-19 Lockdown” • In China, lower demand for electricity during the COVID-19 downturn is affects power generation sectors unevenly. Thermal power generation dropped 9% year-on-year during the first two months of the year, but wind generation increased by 1% and solar generation was up 12%. [Smart Energy]

US:

¶ “US Renewable Energy Increases In 2019” • The production of US energy from solar sources increased by 13.85% in 2019 while output from windpower grew by 10.06%, according to a SUN DAY Campaign analysis of newly-released data from the Energy Information Administration’s latest issue of the Monthly Energy Review. [North American Windpower]

Wind Farm in Kansas (Drenaline, Wikimedia Commons)

¶ “Coronavirus Impact On Construction Of Energy Projects” • The US Renewable Energy Industry, including its construction market, like every sector of the economy, is being affected by the outbreak of coronavirus. The energy industry was designated as a critical infrastructure industry for the nation by the Department of Homeland Security. [JD Supra]

¶ “Natel Gets $11 Million To Deploy Innovative Hydro Turbine” • California-based company Natel Energy has raised $11 million (€10 million) to accelerate deployment of its Restoration Hydro Turbine for sustainable hydropower. The funds come from Schneider Electric Ventures and Bill Gates’ Breakthrough Energy Ventures, Natel said. [Renewables Now]

Restoration Hydro Turbine (Image by Natel Energy)

¶ “Groups Selected For NYSERDA’s Clean Energy Integration Challenge” • Five teams won awards in the first two rounds of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority’s Future Grid Challenge. The challenge is aimed at developing solutions to integrate clean and renewable energy into the electric grid. [Solar Power World]

¶ “Colorado Expedites Tri-State Member Exit Charge Case, As Power Supplier Gets ‘Split Decision’ On FERC Jurisdiction” • FERC determined it does not have exclusive jurisdiction over Tri-State co-op exit charges, as member utilities seek to break away to have better access to renewable energy. Cases before the Colorado PUC can move forward. [Utility Dive]

Have an enjoyably superb day.

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