March 17 Energy News

March 17, 2020

Opinion:

¶ “Oil And Gas Companies See Opportunity In Offshore Wind Energy” • Oil and gas markets have been hit by oversupply, falling prices, and global pandemic, illustrating a need to be more responsive to changes in the energy climate. The good news is that the signs are pointing to more investment in renewables, specifically offshore wind power. [Forbes]

Offshore wind turbine (Picture Alliance via Getty Images)

¶ “Turning Food Waste Into Renewable Energy, A Business Opportunity” • One renewable energy investment entering the US spotlight is anaerobic digestion. As of 2018, the US had over 2,200 sites producing biogas across all 50 states. Digesting waste food gets rid of a waste problem. It also produces electricity sustainably. [Reach Further]

Science and Technology:

¶ “The People Cleaning Up The Oil Spills Of The Amazon” • For decades, pits of waste crude have dotted the Amazon rainforest in northern Ecuador. Now people are using resilient plants, fungi and bacteria to try to clean them up. Bioremediation uses living organisms like plants, fungi, and microbes to break down several pollutants, including crude oil. [BBC]

House and pipeline (Credit: Kimberley Brown)

World:

¶ “Coal Sector Loses Bid To Halt Renewable Energy Deals” • Renewable energy industry body, the South African Wind Energy Association, welcomed a judgement by the Supreme Court of Appeal dismissing a case brought by the Coal Transporters Forum to set aside power purchase agreements with preferred bidders. [ITWeb]

¶ “Ancient Trees In Australia From Time Of Dinosaurs Nearly Wiped Out By Bushfires” • Nightcap oaks, a species that has been around since dinosaurs, have lived through a lot, but humanity’s influence could completely wipe them out. The 2019–2020 bushfire season, caused partly by effects of fossil fuel emission, has decimated them. [CleanTechnica]

Flower growing on stem (Peter Woodard | Poyt448, Wikipedia)

¶ “Europe Warned About Virus Impact On Clean Tech” • The European governments should keep clean energy top of mind as they consider measures to protect their economies against a likely recession caused by the coronavirus, the International Energy Agency said. Border shutdowns risk disrupting supplies for building up renewables. [EURACTIV]

¶ “Renewables Represent 52% Of Total Installed In Mainland Spain” • Spain’s mainland added 6,528 MW of renewables in 2019, increasing green capacity by 13.6% over the previous year, a provisional report issued by Spanish grid operator Red Electrica de Espana says. This means 52% of Spanish mainland capacity is renewable. [Renewables Now]

Wind farm on the Canary Islands

¶ “European Nuclear Plant Operators Gear Up To Ensure Power Supply” • European nuclear power availability is expected to remain robust with strict safety measures that are already being implemented by the major plant operators amid the coronavirus outbreak. This is the message of nuclear operators from several of European countries. [ICIS]

US:

¶ “US Federal Court Requires EPA To Protect Communities Against Worst-Case Chemical Spills” • A federal district court approved a negotiated consent decree between the EPA and a coalition of organizations. This requires the EPA to issue long-overdue protections against worst-case scenario spills of hazardous materials. [CleanTechnica]

Vulnerable chemical facility (NRDC via Twitter | AP)

¶ “Donald Trump Aims To Weaken Ocean Protections” • Earlier this year, the Administration started weakening a key environmental statute, the National Environmental Policy Act. NEPA requires federal agencies to analyze the environmental impacts of major federal actions and ways to mitigate the most harmful effects of those actions. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “US Solar Installations Shot Up Last Year, But Coronavirus Could Have An Impact Going Forward” • A report by the Solar Energy Industries Association and Wood Mackenzie Power & Renewables says almost 40% of US generating capacity added last year was solar. The SEIA is monitoring changes to the industry that COVID-19 pandemic could cause. [CNBC]

Solar array in Massachusetts (Robert Nickelsberg | Getty Images)

¶ “TVA Accepting Proposals For 200 MW Of Renewable Energy” • The Tennessee Valley Authority called on top world developers to submit proposals to develop 200 MW of renewable energy that can be brought online by the end of 2023. Proposals are due to TVA by April 24, 2020, and selected proposals are to be announced in the fall. [Solar Power World]

¶ “Virginia To Try Limited Energy Competition After Dominion Reverses Opposition To Embrace Pilot” • Virginians will see some expansion in their choice of companies to buy electricity. Two proposals killed at the urging of Dominion Energy and Appalachian Power Company were unexpectedly resurrected late in the session. [Virginia Mercury]

Power lines

¶ “Florida, Utah, And Washington Approve Bills To Boost EVs, Including $50 Million Rocky Mountain Power Charging Plan” • State lawmakers have taken significant steps to bolster adoption of emissions-free transportation, in moves that could result in millions of dollars in charging infrastructure investment and more electric vehicles on the road. [Utility Dive]

¶ “NYSERDA Selects Boralex Solar Projects Under Request For Proposal” • Four solar projects of Canadian renewable energy company Boralex were selected by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority under a solicitation of 2019. One project is Greens Corners, at 120 MW; the others are 19.99 MW each. [Power Technology]

Have an agreeably fantastic day.

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