March 3 Energy News

March 3, 2020

Opinion:

¶ “India Has Some Huge Renewable Energy Goals. But Can They Be Achieved?” • India has set itself a goal of having 175 GW of renewable capacity by the year 2022. Considering that India’s installed capacity for all energy sources was a little under 369 GW at the end of January 2020, this is ambitious. Meeting the 175 GW goal could be a tricky proposition. [CNBC]

Wind turbines in India (Rudranil Das | EyeEm | Getty Images)

¶ “Pushing The Wrong Energy Buttons” • India’s Prime Minister Modi and US President Trump encouraged the Nuclear Power Corporation of India and Westinghouse to finalize an agreement for construction of six nuclear reactors in India “at the earliest date.” Instead, they should have encouraged abandoning the proposal altogether. [EnergyInfraPost]

World:

¶ “Turkey Benefits From More World Bank Support To Renewable Energy” • The World Bank’s Board of Executive Directors approved additional financing of €289.5 million ($325 million) to the Turkish Electricity Transmission Company for the Renewable Energy Integration Project. The project was approved with earlier funding in 2014. [Modern Diplomacy]

Renewable energy

¶ “The Most Successful Air Pollution Treaty You’ve Never Heard Of” •  The Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air-Pollution was signed in 1979 by 32 European countries, the US, and Canada. Initially aimed aimed to tackle acid rain, it has enjoyed great success in the fight against air pollution and climate change. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “How To Run The National Electricity Market On 96% Renewables” • Windlab has conducted a simulation of a 96% renewable national electricity market for Australia. The study indicated that a very high penetration rate of renewables on the NEM is possible with readily achievable levels of storage and interconnector upgrades. [RenewEconomy]

Wind farm (David Chang | EPA)

¶ “Neoen Says Hornsdale Tesla Battery Exceeded Expectations” • The Engineering consultant Aurecon Group said the Hornsdale battery installed in South Austrialia has exceeded expectations for the way it has stabilized the grid and lowered grid related costs. It reduced the cost of regulating the South Australian electrical grid by 91%. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “UK Government Lifts Block On New Onshore Windfarm Subsidies” • The UK abandoned its opposition to subsidizing new onshore windfarms, four years after ministers scrapped support for them. The government will remove a block against onshore wind projects by allowing schemes to compete for subsidies with other renewable developments. [The Guardian]

Wind farm (Murdo MacLeod | The Guardian)

¶ “Taskforce Targets Hydrogen Growth In The UK” • A group of ten organisations active in UK energy, including BP and Shell, launched the Hydrogen Taskforce. It offers a shared vision of the role of hydrogen in the transition to net zero emissions. The taskforce has published a report, “The Role of Hydrogen in Delivering Net Zero.” [reNEWS]

¶ “Volvo’s Swedish Bus Plant Powered By Renewable Energy, Including Biofuels” • Volvo announced that its bus plant in Borås, Sweden is one of the first such facilities worldwide to be powered solely by renewable energy, including hydropower and biofuels. In recent years energy consumption at the factory has been cut by 15%. [Biofuels International Magazine]

Volvo bus

US:

¶ “New York Times: Interior Official Pushes Misleading Information On Climate Crisis In Agency Reports” • An Interior Department official was pushing misleading information about climate change into the agency’s reports at the same time the Trump administration was rolling back environmental protection regulations, The New York Times reported. [CNN]

¶ “CIM Begins Construction On Proposed 2.7-GW Westlands Solar Park” • The CIM Group is advancing development of Westlands Solar Park, one of the largest permitted solar parks in the world, it announced. The project will be in California’s San Joaquin Valley. It could grow to over 2,700 MW at full buildout, powering over 1,200,000 homes. [Saurenergy]

ESCO Pacific solar project

¶ “Lawyers For Good Government Climate Change Program Provides Pro-Bono Legal Resources For Municipalities To Switch To 100% Renewable Energy” • Lawyers for Good Government’s Climate Change program aims to use the group’s expansive legal network to support existing programs assisting cities with the shift to 100% renewable energy. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “Michigan Explores Importing More Electricity As Coal Plants Close” • The Midcontinent Independent System Operator, which operates the grid in central US states from the Gulf of Mexico to Canada, launched a study focused on the potential costs and benefits of increasing the import limits into the Lower Peninsula, as coal plants close. [Energy News Network]

Transmission lines

¶ “CenterPoint Energy Aims To Reduce Carbon Emissions By 70% By 2035” • CenterPoint Energy announced that it set a goal of reducing its carbon emissions 70% by 2035. It plans to develop alternative energy sources. Electric utility Vectren, a CenterPoint company based in Evansville, Indiana, is updating its 20-year power generation plan. [Evansville Courier & Press]

¶ “Poll Says Utahns Support Closing Coal-Fired Plants Early” • New polling suggests that Utahns support by a wide margin early retirements for Rocky Mountain Power’s coal-fired power plants in favor of using renewable energy sources such as wind and solar. A majority of people, 53% supported closing coal-fired plants; 33% did not. [Salt Lake Tribune]

Have a fundamentally superior day.

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