September 16 Energy News

September 16, 2019

Opinion:

¶ “The Shift To Solar, Wind, And Electric Vehicles Is Too Monumental To Overstate” • The transition is happening. Wind energy, solar energy, and electric transport are the better, more cost-competitive products, and they are winning today in the marketplace. But the transition could be happening faster, and it should be happening faster. [CleanTechnica]

Tesla Model S (Chanan Bos | CleanTechnica)

¶ “Fossil Fuel Companies Roll Out A New Era Of Spin” • Over the years, fossil fuel companies have poured millions into sowing doubt about climate science and burnishing their public image. Now, they are reckoning with a different communications challenge: convincing their investors that the future of oil and gas companies is bright. [Grist]

Science and Technology:

¶ “Faster Pace Of Climate Change Is ‘scary,’ Former Chief Scientist Says” • Speaking to the BBC, Professor Sir David King, a former chief scientific adviser to the government of the UK, said, “It’s appropriate to be scared. We predicted temperatures would rise, but we didn’t foresee these sorts of extreme events we’re getting so soon.” [BBC]

Wildfire (Getty Images)

World:

¶ “One Of India’s Largest Coal-Mining States Says It Will Not Build New Coal Power Plants” • The central Indian state of Chhattisgarh, home to the country’s third-largest coal reserves, will not build any new coal power plants, the chairman of the Chhattisgarh State Power Distribution Company, a state-owned utility, told Quartz India. [Quartz]

¶ “Frankfurt Motor Show Hit By Huge Climate Protests” • Thousands of climate protesters marched in Frankfurt against the role of Germany’s car industry in climate change and the destruction of the environment. As they paraded past Frankfurt’s annual motor show, they called for an end of vehicles with combustion engines. [CNN]

Frankfurt protest (Boris Roessler | DPA | AFP | Getty Images)

¶ “Renewable Energy Festival Research Shows Scots Are Clued Up” • Research released to mark the beginning of the Scottish Renewable Energy Festival found that 47% of 1002 Scottish adults surveyed said they now think more about the sustainability of the type of energy powering their home than they did in 2014. Only 3% said they are less aware. [The National]

¶ “Ofgem Green-Lights Orkney Transmission Link” • UK energy regulator Ofgem approved SSE Networks’ proposals to build a 220-MW link between Orkney with the Scottish mainland, on the condition that at least 135 MW of new Orkney wind projects are awarded a Contract for Difference or are judged likely to be developed by December 2021. [reNEWS]

Orkney (Image: reNEWS)

¶ “Tata Power Renewable Energy Limited Commissions 150 MW Solar Capacity In Rajasthan” • Tata Power, the largest integrated power company in India, announced the commissioning of 150 MW of solar capacity in Rajasthan by a wholly owned subsidiary. With this, the overall operating renewable capacity of TPREL in India now stands at 2,628 MW. [Equity Bulls]

¶ “Nationals MPs Snub Launch Of Farming Group’s Climate Change Report” • A report, launched by Farmers for Climate Action group at Parliament House in Canberra, warned that agricultural production will fall, farm profits will decline, and food insecurity will increase absent a cohesive national strategy on climate change and agriculture. [The Guardian]

Raspberries in Tasmania (Rafael Ben Ari | Alamy Stock Photo)

¶ “UTM To Participate In Global Climate Strike” • University of Toronto Mississauga will hold a series of events in support of the Global Climate Strikes taking place on September 20 and 27. The dates coincide with the upcoming a UN Climate Action Summit, which aims to present viable plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. [Varsity]

¶ “Fukushima Fishermen Concerned For Future Over Release Of Radioactive Water” • Having spent the past eight years rebuilding from the Fukushima Disaster, the local fishing fleet is worried. It appears increasingly likely that the nuclear plant’s operator, TEPCO, will dump huge quantities of radioactive water into the ocean. [The Guardian]

Poor catch at Fukushima (Koji Ueda | AP)

¶ “Broad Coalition Representing Millions Of Australians Opposes Nuclear Power” • More than 40 groups representing millions of Australians have come together to issue a clear message to the federal government that the nation’s energy future is renewable, “not radioactive.” The mining industry is calling for the ban on nuclear energy to be lifted. [SBS]

US:

¶ “Maine Ocean Institute Launching New Climate Center” • The Gulf of Maine Research Institute says its new climate center will be “a new interdisciplinary center focused on solutions to local, regional, and global challenges related to ocean warming.” The Gulf of Maine has numerous fisheries and is warming faster than most ocean waters. [Boston.com]

Gulf of Maine (Yoon S Byun | The Boston Globe)

¶ “Minnesota Grows Business, Jobs As It Greens The Local Economy” • In Minnesota, 25% of electric power is renewable. Now policymakers and utilities talk about doubling that by 2030. Several announcements in the last few days alone will advance the renewable-energy, less-carbon and faster-growing Minnesota economy. [Minneapolis Star Tribune]

¶ “How American Communities Are Preparing For The Impacts Of Climate Change” • A study from the American Association for the Advancement of Science found that many communities across the US are addressing their own unique challenges associated with climate change. Some communities are also working to reduce emissions. [Earth.com]

Have a transformatively pleasing day.

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