May 24 Energy News

May 24, 2019

Science and Technology:

¶ “Scientists Discover Sustainable Alternatives To Cement” • Cement manufacture is responsible for 8% of the global CO₂ emissions each year. Scientists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg say they have found environmentally friendly, low carbon alternatives to cement can be made from two types of industrial residues. [CleanTechnica]

Cement manufacturing plant

World:

¶ “EDF And Masdar Enter Morocco Solar Market With Massive 800-MW Win” • The Moroccan Agency for Solar Energy has announced that it awarded 800-MW Noor Midelt I project to a consortium of EDF Renewables and Masdar Group. The project will host a combination of solar PV and concentrated solar power technologies. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “School Students Walk Out In Global Climate Strike” • In New Zealand and Australia, students went on strike again, starting off a worldwide day of climate change protests. Organizers expect more than a million young people will participate in at least 110 countries, calling for politicians and businesses to take action to fight climate change. [BBC]

Climate protest in Melbourne (Reuters)

¶ “Elmed Interconnector Aims To Bring Solar Power From The Sahara To Europe” • It’s been a long-held European dream to get solar energy from North Africa. Italy and Tunesia have taken a first step to make this dream come true. They entered into an agreement for the development and joint construction of a 600-MW electricity link. [Deutsche Welle]

¶ “Montenegro moves to halt small hydro power plants” • Under pressure from environmental groups, Montenegro’s government has decided to stop issuing permits for the construction of small hydro-power plants. It will also reconsider those awarded so far, the economy minister said. A boom in dam construction has drawn protests. [ETEnergyworld.com]

Hydro dam

¶ “Senegal Imports Turbines For West Africa’s First Big Wind Farm Project” • Senegal started importing turbines for its first large-scale wind farm, the biggest such project in West Africa. It will supply nearly a sixth of the country’s power. Lekela, a British renewable power company, expects the wind farm to reach 158.7 MW by 2020. [ETEnergyworld.com]

¶ “Offshore Supply Chain Jobs ‘At Risk’ In Germany” • A lack of offshore wind auctions in Germany is putting jobs at risk in the country’s supply chain, according to WindEurope. The trade body said the last auction was in April 2018 and no more are scheduled until 2021. This means order books in the supply chain are “drying up.” [reNEWS]

Offshore wind power (WindEurope image)

¶ “LEGO Is Running 100% On Renewable Energy Three Years Ahead Of Schedule” • A few years ago, LEGO’s corporate side set an ambitious goal of making its production facilities run entirely on renewable energy. Their original plan was to reach that goal by 2022, but things went faster than they expected. They reached it three years early. [GOOD Magazine]

US:

¶ “Many States Squander VW Settlement Money, US PIRG Report Shows” • In its settlement with federal authorities over its diesel cheating scheme, VW agreed to provide nearly $3 billion to all 50 states. Nearly all states have reported what they will do with the funds, and US PIRG says many are failing to use the funds to do the most good. [CleanTechnica]

Electric school bus

¶ “$4,000 Used Plug-in Hybrid And EV Buyer Incentive Offered By Peninsula Clean Energy” • In San Mateo County, California, just south of San Francisco, Peninsula Clean Energy is offering a $4,000 incentive for qualifying residents who buy used plug-in hybrids and EVs. The incentive is part of a collaboration with Peninsula Family Service. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “Providence, Rhode Island Trials Autonomous Shuttle From May Mobility” • Financed in part by money from the VW diesel cheating settlement, a fleet of 6 passenger autonomous shuttles supplied by May Mobility began operating this week on a 5.3-mile fixed route that connects downtown Providence with Olneyville Square. [CleanTechnica]

May Mobiity shuttle (May Mobility image)

¶ “Dairyland To Milk South Dakota Wind” • Dairyland Power Cooperative is to source 52 MW of electricity from Avangrid Renewables’ Tatanka Ridge wind farm in South Dakota. The 154.8-MW project will have 56 GE wind turbines. Construction is expected to start this year, with commercial operation starting by year-end 2020. [reNEWS]

¶ “QTS Buying Wind Power For Two Data Centers” • Data center service provider QTS Realty Trust agreed to buy electricity from wind farms in Illinois and Texas to cover 100% of the expected demand of two data centers. It said the 10-year PPA will offset consumption of its data centers in Chicago and Piscataway, New Jersey. [Renewables Now]

Wind park in Texas (Rockin’Rita, CC-BY-NC-ND 2.0)

¶ “Oregon Restricts Solar Development On Prime Farmland” • As Oregon’s climate policies steer the state toward renewable energy like solar, its land use laws are putting up roadblocks. The Oregon Land Conservation and Development Commission approved new rules that restrict commercial solar development on high-value farmland. [OPB News]

¶ “Energy Negotiations Unravel At The Capitol, Leaving Little Accomplished” • Minnesota will not join the states that have laws aimed at having 100% clean energy by 2050, at least not this year. Negotiations between the House and Senate broke down over numerous issues, including lifting the state’s ban on new nuclear plants. [Minnesota Public Radio News]

Have a positively enchanting day.

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