November 16 Energy News

November 16, 2018

Science and Technology:

¶ “A Warmer Planet Means Hurricanes Will Drop More Rain and Have Higher Winds” • A report published in the journal Nature, suggests that future hurricanes could drop up to 30% more rain and have winds as much as 33 miles per hour stronger than current storms if global warming reaches 2°C to 3°C, the rise that is currently expected. [CleanTechnica]

Hurricane Harvey from space

World:

¶ “Victorian Coalition Energy Policies to Drive Highest Power Prices and Pollution Levels of Major Parties: RepuTex Analysis” • A report by energy market analyst RepuTex modelled the impact of the energy policies of political parties. It was called a “confirmation that an electricity system driven by coal is the worst of all worlds.” [pv magazine Australia]

¶ “IHS Increases Its 2018 China Solar PV Outlook to 40 GW” • IHS Markit has revised its 2018 China solar PV forecast upwards to 40 GW in the wake of news that the country’s National Energy Administration is considering increasing its 2020 PV target to as much as 270 gigawatts GW. [CleanTechnica]

Rooftop solar systems in China

¶ “Nine of 17 CPEC Power Plants to Be Run on Coal” • A deposit in Pakistan’s Thar Desert is believed to have 175 billion tonnes of coal. While coal is going out of vogue in most other parts of the world because of its environmental impact, it is expected to fuel nine of the 17 proposed China-Pakistan Economic Corridor power plants. [The Express Tribune]

¶ “Major Businesses Across 140 nations Shift to Renewables” • According to a report from RE100, a dramatic upsurge in demand for renewables is seeing multinational businesses moving away from fossil fuels in more than 140 markets around the world. Japan, Australia, Mexico, Turkey, and Taiwan are growth hotspots. [Energy Live News]

Wind turbines (Shutterstock image)

¶ “Spain to Nix Nuclear and Coal Power by 2030” • Spain will close the last of its nuclear reactors and coal power plants before 2030, according to State Secretary for Energy José Dominguez. He made the announcement shortly after the government of Spain pledged to work towards a 100% renewably powered electricity system. [EURACTIV]

¶ “Innovator Tempus Energy Successfully Challenges Fossil Fuel Bias in UK Power Market” • A ruling by the European Court has decided that £5.6 billion in subsidies for fossil fuels, paid for by British taxpayers, is unlawful, in a case brought by cleantech innovation company Tempus Energy against the government of the UK. [Renewable Energy Magazine]

Coal-burning power plant

US:

¶ “America’s Wind Farms Are Ready to Go It Alone” • For a quarter-century, the wind industry has been supported by federal tax credits that helped it attract investments of $250 billion. That support ends next year, but analysts and executives say the credits have done what they were supposed to do: make the industry competitive. [BloombergQuint]

¶ “SRP Plans 1,000 MW of New Solar Energy by 2025” • Salt River Project, an Arizona utility, announced plans to add 1,000 MW of solar energy to its system by the end of fiscal year 2025. The plan will increase both the pace and the total capacity of SRP’s solar energy resource goals by 700 MW, compared to the current resource plan. [Payson Roundup]

PV installation (Jeff Scheid, Las Vegas Review-Journal)

¶ “At UN Climate Talks, Trump Team Plans Sideshow on Coal” • The Trump administration is planning to set up a side-event promoting fossil fuels at the annual UN climate talks next month, repeating a strategy that infuriated global-warming activists during last year’s talks, according to three people with knowledge of the matter. [CNBC]

¶ “Shell Soaks in EDF California Sun” • EDF Renewables is to sell Shell Energy North America electricity from the Maverick 4 solar farm under a 15-year power purchase agreement. The 132-MW solar farm covers 1271 hectares (3,141 acres) of federal land and is part of the 500-MW Palen PV complex in California’s Mojave desert. [reNEWS]

EDF solar plant

¶ “US Energy Firm AES Commits to 70% Carbon Reduction in Climate Scenario Report” • AES, one of the world’s largest power companies, has released a report detailing the company’s moves to reduce carbon emissions 70% by 2030. The report also makes projections on the environmental and energy transition impacts of the move. [pv magazine International]

¶ “Developers Propose Adding Additional 350 MW of Offshore Wind Power” • Rhode Island has tripled the state’s supply of renewable energy in the last two years on the way to a 1,000-MW goal, according to Gov Gina Raimondo. Now, developers answering a call for proposals on offshore windpower have entered bids for as much as 350 MW. [newportri.com]

Block Island wind farm (Associated Press file photo)

¶ “Appalachian Power Seeks up to 200 MW of Solar” • American Electric Power subsidiary Appalachian Power issued a request for proposals for up to 200 MW of PV projects in Virginia. The company says it is looking to reduce customer costs and further diversify generating mix, which currently produces about 1,900 GWh/year of renewable energy. [Solar Industry]

¶ “DOE Considers Subsidies Modeled on Renewables for Small Modular Nuclear Reactors” • Incentives such as those used to spur widespread adoption of renewables technologies offer a promising model to address challenges to commercialize small modular reactors, says a report by the DOE’s Office of Nuclear Energy. [POWER magazine]

Have a prodigiously charming day.

geoharvey is free and without ads.
Donate with PayPal
geoharvey is not tax-deductible.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: