September 21 Energy News

September 21, 2018

Science and Technology:

¶ “Solar Energy Largely Unscathed by Hurricane Florence’s Wind and Rain” • Faced with Hurricane Florence’s powerful winds and record rainfall, North Carolina’s solar farms held up with only minimal damage while other parts of the electricity system failed. The state’s nuclear and coal power plants had some problems. [InsideClimate News]

Storm damage (Chip Somodevilla | Getty Images)

¶ “Cheap Alternative To Lithium Could Be Used In Next Generation Of Batteries” • Researchers from Purdue University have found a way to produce efficient sodium-ion batteries that are as functional and cheaper than its lithium counterpart. Lithium is extremely rare and there are worries that its supply could be limited. [Tech Times]

¶ “Offshore mussels from Brussels” • Mussels were cultivated at an offshore wind farm in the Belgian North Sea as part of a test project of a Belgian consortium that includes DEME Group, other companies, and research institutions. They are researching the potential of offshore wind turbine foundations as a habitat to grow the seafood. [reNews]

Mussels from an offshore wind farm (DEME Group image)

World:

¶ “Corporate & Regional Leaders Launch Net Zero Carbon Buildings Commitment” • A group of 38 businesses, cities, states, and regions partnered with the World Green Building Council to launch the Net Zero Carbon Buildings Commitment. They intend to start a movement towards decarbonizing the built environment. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “1,600 Volkswagen Electric Trucks For Brazil” • Volkswagen makes electric trucks? Well, yes, it does – or it will. Not only that, but Ambev Brewery in Brazil has ordered a whopping 1,600 of them. Oh, but just to be clear, the orders are to be fulfilled by 2023. Production, CleanTechnica was told, is expected to begin in 2020. [CleanTechnica]

Volkswagen e-Delivery electric truck

¶ “Toyota Motor to fund new renewable energy projects in Japan, including geothermal” • Toyota Motor Corp has announced that it is to invest $270 million into renewable energy fund to push development of new solar, wind, biomass, and geothermal power plants. Its goal is to power Toyota factories and dealerships in Japan. [ThinkGeoEnergy]

¶ “Permit issued for tidal power project in Nova Scotia” • Nova Scotia authorities have issued a marine renewable energy permit for a tidal electricity project in the Bay of Fundy. The permit was issued to Black Rock Tidal Power allowing the business to perform tests on a 280-kW floating platform over a period of up to six months. [CNBC]

Bay of Fundy (Mike Grandmaison |
All Canada Photos | Getty Images)

¶ “Ontario Tories seek to scrap Green Energy Act” • Months after cancelling hundreds of renewable energy contracts, the Ontario government introduced legislation to scrap a law that aimed to bolster the province’s green energy industry. Premier Doug Ford had made a campaign promise in the last election to repeal the Green Energy Act. [Niagarathisweek.com]

¶ “ADB lends $40 million for hybrid renewables project in Mongolia” • The Asian Development Bank said it will provide a $40 million (€33.9 million) loan to support a 41-MW distributed renewable energy project in Mongolia. The system will include solar and wind capacity, battery storage, and a 500-kW heat pump for public buildings. [Renewables Now]

Yurts

US:

¶ “Kentucky utilities to propose Green Energy tariff to drive renewable energy growth” • Louisville Gas and Electric Company and Kentucky Utilities Company have recently said that they will propose a Green Tariff to promote renewable energy growth and economic development in a rate review filing on September 28. [Daily Energy Insider]

¶ “US Solar Installation Costs Declined In 2017, Little Progress So Far In 2018” • The eleventh edition of Berkeley Lab’s Tracking the Sun report published this week shows that the installed price of solar continued to fall across the country in 2017 but only saw small declines through the beginning of 2018. Tariffs on solar PVs may be to blame. [CleanTechnica]

Solar system in California

¶ “AEP Ohio Files For Huge Renewable Energy Increase” • American Electric Power has filed an amended Long-Term Forecast Report with the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio that shows the need for at least 900 MW of new renewable generation resources in the state. This would more than double Ohio’s clean energy. [Solar Industry]

¶ “Colorado electric cooperative aims at 70% clean energy by 2030” • Holy Cross Energy, an electric cooperative in Colorado, set a target of sourcing at least 70% of the power provided to its members from clean and renewable energy by 2030, up from 39% now. Another goal is a 70% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from 2014. [Renewables Now]

Colorado wind turbines

¶ “Northern Indiana utility ditching coal in favor of renewable energy in next 10 years” • The Northern Indiana Public Service Company announced that it will speed up the retirement of its coal-fired generation by as much as ten years – planning to replace the entire fleet with wind, solar, and batteries within ten years. [Indianapolis Star]

¶ “The last nuclear reactors under construction in the US are facing opposition” • The last two nuclear reactors under construction in the US are at the Vogtle power plant in Georgia. Now, the three major owners of the construction project are getting ready to vote in coming days on whether to keep it going or cut their losses. [Ars Technica]

Have a totally carefree day.

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