July 31 Energy News

July 31, 2021

Opinion:

¶ “Confession Time: I Might Be In Love With The Xbus” • The world is rapidly filling up with big, tough, capable electric trucks that are ready to rough-and-tumble their way through a post-apocalyptic landscape. The Xbus, meanwhile, says something different. Like an angry koala, it seems to say, “I’m sensitive – but, also: fight me.” [CleanTechnica]

Xbus (Image courtesy of Xbus)

¶ “Toyota Actively Lobbying To Slow Down EV Revolution” • We learned in June that Toyota was the largest corporate contributor to members of Congress who voted against certifying the result of the last election. Now, we see in the New York Times that Toyota is lobbying hard to sidetrack President Biden’s electric car and climate change initiatives. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “We Are Living Through A New, Horrible Phase Of Climate Change” • In the past four weeks alone, wildfires virtually burnt a Canadian village off the map after it shattered the national record with heat of 49.6°C (121°F). Floodwaters tore through German towns like a tsunami, tossing cars like corks. This was predicted. More is coming. [CNA]

Climate crime scene (Ehimetalor Akhere Unuabona, Unsplash)

¶ “Fact Check: Posts Falsely Claim 95% Of Energy For Charging Electric Cars Comes From Coal” • Social media users are using an outdated and misleading video to claim automaker General Motors said 95% of energy for charging electric cars comes from coal. The video is based on a misleading statement founded on obsolete information, but it has spread. [USA Today]

Science and Technology:

¶ “‘Fort Renewable’ Shows Benefits Of Batteries And Microgrids For Military And Beyond” • The National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s Flatirons Campus might feel familiar to military service members. Here at “Fort Renewable,” military Quonset huts are dispersed among energy assets like solar PVs and battery storage, to test microgrids. [CleanTechnica]

Replicated military microgrid environments (NREL image)

¶ “Hydrogen Produced Using Renewables Will Be Able To Travel Through Existing Gas Pipelines, Snam CEO Says” • The CEO of Italian infrastructure giant Snam outlined a vision for the future of hydrogen. He said Snam had tested different percentages of blending – including as much as 100% hydrogen – in existing pipes, and it had worked. [CNBC]

World:

¶ “Tesla Megapack Battery Caught On Fire During Neoen’s Testing, No One Injured” • For the first time, a Tesla Megapack caught on fire. It was at the Victoria Big Battery in Moorabool, Victoria. News7 Melbourne shared images of one Megapack battery unit that was ablaze. It looks like two battery units were affected. The fire’s cause is still unknown. [CleanTechnica]

Tesla Megapack

¶ “CI NMF Inks Over $200 Million Investment Pact With Amp Energy” • Copenhagen Infrastructure New Markets Fund agreed with Amp Energy India Private Ltd on joint equity investment of over $200 million in renewables. The agreement enables joint equity investments of over $200 million in renewable energy projects in India. [Free Press Journal]

¶ “TC Energy To Use Green Power To Run North American Energy Pipelines” • TC Energy Corp could spend billions of dollars on its plans to lower emissions by switching to renewable energy to run its huge network of US and Canadian oil and gas pipelines. Based in Calgary, TC Energy operates nearly 100,000 kilometres (62,140 miles) of pipelines. [Reuters]

Pipeline (Darya Jum, Unsplash)

¶ “Mainstream Renewable Power And Siemens Team Up For Supply Chain Focussed ScotWind Bid” • Mainstream Renewable Power, the Irish green energy developer, and Siemens Financial Services joined forces to bid for acreage in Scottish waters. They bid together in the landmark ScotWind leasing round, which is now closed to applicants. [Energy Voice]

¶ “ReneSola Teams Up With UK Partner On Italian PV” • Emeren is partnering with ReneSola to develop ground-mounted solar farms in Italy totaling 110 MW. The partners said the projects are in a broad range of sizes. Their goal is to have all 110 MW shovel-ready by 2022. The two companies hope to further strengthen their presence in the Italian market. [reNEWS]

Solar panels (Karsten Würth, Unsplash)

¶ “Nuclear Power Plant In China Has Damaged Fuel Rods And Is Shutting Down” • A nuclear plant in China was shut down after its fuel rods suffered damage, according to an initial report from the China-based news source CGTN. Located in Taishan, the reactor is the first-of-its-kind, and came after the nation had acknowledged the issue. [Interesting Engineering]

US:

¶ “Duke Energy Aims For 16,000 MW Of Renewables By 2025” • Duke Energy announced that it owns, operates, or purchases more than 10,000 MW of solar and wind energy throughout the US from its regulated and nonregulated businesses. Duke Energy has set a goal of reaching 16,000 MW of renewables by 2025 and 47,000 MW by 2050. [GreentechLead]

Wind turbines (Dan Meyers, Unsplash)

¶ “The Dixie Fire Reignites Trauma For People Who Survived California’s Deadliest Wildfire In History” • The Dixie Fire is California’s largest active wildfire, having burned more than 240,000 acres of land over the course of two weeks. More than 7,800 residents across Butte and Plumas counties have been ordered to evacuate. [CNN]

¶ “The Infrastructure Bill’s $7.5 Billion For EV Charging Stations Can Do A Lot” • While small in comparison to the other big ticket items, latest version of an infrastructure bill allocates $7.5 billion for the construction of new charging stations. Even though it is half of what was in the original budget, it is enough for 250,000 EV charging stations. [CleanTechnica]

Have a tolerably exquisite day.

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