May 28 Energy News

May 28, 2020

Opinion:

¶ “The Climate Change Clues Hidden In Art History” • As scientists, policy-makers, and members of the public attempt to make sense of the climate crisis, art historians are finding clues about how our relationship with nature has changed, about past and present societies’ ideas of climate, and even about the physical changes of our planet. [BBC]

The Icebergs, Frederic Edwin Church (Dallas Museum of Art)

¶ “A Single Mega-Project Exposes The Morrison Government’s Gas Plan As Staggering Folly” • The Australian government’s “technology investment roadmap” says natural gas will help in “balancing” renewable energy. But just one proposed project could produce 1.5% of the CO₂ the entire world can allow, if it is to limit warming to 1.5°C. [Australian Times]

Science and Technology:

¶ “Migratory Birds In The Eastern US Are Struggling To Adapt To Climate Change” • As their breeding grounds shrink, migratory birds in eastern North America may be particularly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, compared with birds that stay put during the winter, scientists reported in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [MSN Money]

Male Indigo Bunting (© Steve Rushing | Popular Science)

World:

¶ “Algeria Plans 4-GW, Five Year Solar Power Initiative” • Algeria is talking about building 4 GW of solar power capacity in 5 years. Algeria has a population of 44 million. It also has an abundance of sunshine. Nonetheless, 4 GW means increasing the country’s solar power capacity ten times over. To do that, it’s getting a large infusion of cash. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “Turkey Records All-Time Daily High In Domestic And Renewable Electricity” • The Turkism Minister for Energy and Natural Resources announced that on May 24, Turkey set a record daily high for renewable energy power generation, Daily Sabah reported. Turkey’s renewable sources provided nearly 90% of the country’s electricity. [ThinkGeoEnergy]

Turkish geothermal power plant (Source: Zorlu Enerji)

¶ “Oman Using Bifacial Solar Panels In Giant 500 MW Solar Farm” • Oman has a lot of solar resources and it is building a giant 500-MW solar farm to make use of them. But it’s not just any 500-MW solar behemoth. It will have high-efficiency bifacial solar modules. China’s Jolywood (Suzhou) Sunwatt has shipped the modules already. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “Solar Leads Australia’s Energy Transition As Renewables Set New Record” • According to Australian federal government statistics, renewable sources contributed 55,481 GWh in 2019, 21% of total electricity generation. This represents an increase of 12%, compared with 2018. Solar power led the way, with a 46% increase in the year. [pv magazine Australia]

Renewable energy in Australia (Image: SMA Solar Technology)

¶ “Plans Go In For Sizewell C” • The development consent order application to build Sizewell C, an £18-billion nuclear power plant in Suffolk, was submitted to the Planning Inspectorate. Sizewell C will be a near replica of Hinkley Point C being built by EDF in Somerset. It is to have a pair of 1670-MW European Pressurised Reactor units. [The Construction Index]

US:

¶ “Rooftop Solar And Grid-Scale Storage Move Forward In Hawaii” • Hawaii has the most aggressive zero emission electricity policy of all US states – 100% by 2045. Lots of states like to talk about their low carbon goals, but Hawaii is walking the clean energy walk. It’s possible it could reach its zero emissions goal ahead of schedule. [CleanTechnica]

Please click on the image to enlarge it. (Hawaiian Electric)

¶ “US To Halt 1.75 Million Barrels Of Oil Production Per Day – Just The Beginning” • The oil industry is in trouble. Peak oil demand was gone long before the coronavirus and dumping by other countries. And the long-term outlook doesn’t look any rosier for this fossil industry. IHS Markit forecasts production curtailment in the US. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “Renewables Crushing Coal – Won 100 Days Already In 2020” • The US has seen year-to-date performance for renewables that is dramatically above any previous year’s. Renewables are on a streak going on right now, overtaking coal for production of electricity on a daily basis for 100 days so far this year, and for 60 days in a row. [CleanTechnica]

Wind farm (Image: blog.ucsusa.org, via Twitter)

¶ “US Provides Additional Safe Harbour For Renewables In Post-Covid-19 World” • US renewable energy projects that have been hit by supply chain delays caused by the Covid-19 crisis have been granted an extra year to meet safe harbour requirements and qualify for federal tax credits. A notice published by the IRS offers tax relief. [Renewables Now]

¶ “Coal’s Decline Continues With Thirteen Plant Closures Announced In 2020” • Power companies have announced plans to close thirteen coal plants this year, according to an E&E News review of federal data and companies’ closure plans. Two other plants will be converted to natural gas. Burning coal is no longer economically sound. [Scientific American]

Coal loading facility (Richard Hamilton Smith | Getty Images)

¶ “US Renewables Produce 17.5% More Electricity Than Coal During Q1 Of 2020 – Solar Grows 23% And Wind 17%” • US Renewable energy sources produced significantly more electricity than coal during the first quarter of 2020 and also topped nuclear power in both February and March, a SUN DAY Campaign analysis of EIA data shows. [pvbuzz media]

¶ “Shell Seals Offtake For Virginia Solar Double” • Shell signed power purchase agreements for the output from two PV projects under construction in Virginia totaling 45 MW. Shell Energy North America will take 90% of the electricity generated by the Briel Farm and Gardy’s Mill solar plants over the next ten years. Both will be commissioned by the year-end. [reNEWS]

Have a superbly gorgeous day.

geoharvey is free and without ads.
Donate with PayPal
geoharvey is not tax-deductible.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: