May 12 Energy News

May 12, 2020

Science and Technology:

¶ “Extreme Heat Events Have Arrived Earlier Than Feared, Climate Study Finds” • Climate scientists have previously warned that a lethal combination of heat and humidity will make some inhabited parts of the planet uninhabitable for months at a time in the decades to come. New research published in the journal Science Advances finds that future is now. [ThePrint]

Arctic ice (Pixabay image)

¶ “Water Loss In Northern Peatlands Threatens To Intensify Fires, Global Warming” • A group of 59 international scientists, led by researchers at Canada’s McMaster University, has new information about the distinct effects of climate change on boreal forests and peatlands, which threaten to worsen wildfires and accelerate global warming. [Science Daily]

World:

¶ “India’s Carbon Emissions Fall For First Time In Four Decades” • India’s CO₂ emissions fell for the first time in four decades. Even before India’s coronavirus lockdown, falling electricity use and competition from renewables had weakened the demand for fossil fuels, according to analysis by the environmental website Carbon Brief. [BBC]

Wind turbines (Getty Images)

¶ “Climate Change: Study Pours Cold Water On Oil Company Net Zero Claims” • Claims by oil and gas companies that they are curbing their carbon emissions in line with net zero targets are overstated, according to a new review. The independent analysis of six large European corporations acknowledges they have taken big steps on CO₂ recently. [BBC]

¶ “China Invests In EV Charging Infrastructure To Offset Coronavirus Economic Slump” • The response by the Chinese and US governments to the economic slowdown caused by the coronavirus could not be more different. While the US is propping up wealthy corporations, China is investing in EV charging infrastructure. [CleanTechnica]

WiTricity to install wireless charging (Screenshot: WiTricity)

¶ “11,000 Air Pollution-Related Deaths Avoided In Europe As Coal And Oil Consumption Plummet” • Centre for Research on Energy and Clean Air points out in a report that approximately 11,000 air pollution-related deaths were avoided as cars and factories were idled and coal and oil consumption plummeted in Europe. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “Construction Of Two Renewable Energy Projects In Spain Begins” • Construction of two renewable energy projects by Enel Green Power has begun in Spain. The Los Naranjos PV plant, which will have a capacity of about 50 MW, is being built in Andalusia, and the 21.3-MW Los Gigantes wind farm is under construction in Aragon. [Construction Review]

Solar plants already installed in Andalusia
(Abengoa Solar, Wikimedia Commons)

¶ “Mexico Suspends Work On Under-Construction Renewable Projects During Covid-19 Emergency” • Mexico announced the suspension of all trials for solar and wind projects. Neoen’s 375-MW El Lano solar plant, completed earlier this year, will have to sit idle until trials restart. The loss in earnings is calculated to be $2 million per month. [Energy Live News]

¶ “Belgium’s Nuclear Power Gamble” • Over 50% of electricity generated in Belgium in 2019 was from the country’s two nuclear power plants, but the plan is to phase them out by end-2025. Volatile and unpredictable prices for power, gas and EU carbon allowances makes investments in new gas-fired plants a risky business. [Energy Voice]

Vilvoorde site and gas-fired power plant (Via Twitter)

US:

¶ “Federal Approval For 690-MW Nevada PV” • The US federal government has given the green light for the 690-MW Gemini solar and battery storage project in Nevada. The Bureau of Land Management and the US Department of the Interior approved the $1.1 billion project, backed by Quinbrook Infrastructure Partners. [reNEWS]

¶ “Coronavirus: Musk Defies Orders And Reopens Tesla’s California Plant” • Tesla has reopened its only US electric car plant in California, despite local orders against manufacturing. On Monday, the company’s chief executive Elon Musk tweeted that production had restarted and he would be “on the line with everyone else.” [BBC]

Elon Musk (Getty Images)

¶ “US Coal-Fired Electricity Generation In 2019 Falls To 42-Year Low – EIA” • Output from the US coal-fired generating fleet dropped to 966,000 GWh in 2019, the lowest level since 1976. The decline in last year’s coal generation levels was the largest percentage decline in history (16%) and second-largest in absolute terms (240,000 GWh). [Renewables Now]

¶ “Arkansas Green Lights AEP 810-MW Wind” • Southwestern Electric Power Company, a subsidiary of American Electric Power, got approval from Arkansas regulators to add 810 MW of wind energy from three projects. The projects are to be finished in 2020 and 2021, to supply power to customers in Arkansas, Louisiana, Texas, and Oklahoma. [reNEWS]

Wind turbine (Matt Artz | Unsplash)

¶ “PacifiCorp Readies Huge Solicitation for Renewables, Energy Storage” • Utility group PacifiCorp has an integrated resource plan that envisions reliance on wind farms and solar backed by energy storage. Now, it is preparing a solicitation for projects to meet that plan’s needs through 2024, taking a concrete step toward its vision. [Greentech Media]

¶ “Great River Energy To Exit Coal, Close 1.15-GW Plant, But North Dakota Governor Vows Rescue” • Minnesota’s Great River Energy plans to retire the 1,151-MW Coal Creek Station in the second half of 2022 and add 1,100 MW of wind energy purchases by the end of 2023. Republicans in North Dakota vowed to keep the coal plant open. [Utility Dive]

Have an abundantly agreeable day.

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