December 27 Energy News

December 27, 2019

Opinion:

¶ “Frugal Innovation Offers An Opportunity To Democratize Electricity” • One of the islands of Vanuatu is testing ‘Power Blox,’ grid-tied modular power cubes that deliver renewable energy. They can be expanded as needed by the community, without damaging the environment. The more blocks you add, the stronger the grid becomes. [UNDP]

Working with Power Blox (Photo: UNDP Vanuatu)

¶ “Darren Springer & Rebecca Towne: Renewable Energy Standard Is Driving Emissions Reductions” • Vermont’s renewable energy standard is beginning to make meaningful changes in the challenging areas of heating and transportation, which are the greatest source of Vermont carbon emissions and need our focused effort. [vtdigger.org]

Science and Technology:

¶ “Floating Solar On Pumped Hydro, Part 1: Evaporation Management Is A Bonus” • There are several pros and cons to putting floating solar on pumped hydro reservoirs: evaporation control, panel efficiency, reuse of transmission connections, volatile water levels, shadowed reservoirs, water movement, and relative cost. [CleanTechnica]

Pumped storage hydro reservoir in Michigan

¶ “Renewable Natural Gas Creating Opportunity to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions” • Organically derived renewable natural gas has the potential to significantly reduce GHG emissions in the world’s most carbon-dependent industries. RNG from biological waste can be easily deployed by utilities and for transportation. [Investing News Network]

¶ “California, Climate Change And The Trauma Of The Last Decade” • The wildfires were more destructive. The drought was the longest on record. In 2015, the Sierra snowpack reached its lowest level in 500 years, but the storms, when they finally came, unleashed more water than our dams could contain. California is experiencing climate change. [Los Angeles Times]

Woolsey fire, 2018 (Wally Skalij | Los Angeles Times)

¶ “Counting The Cost 2019: A Year Of Climate Breakdown” • Christian Aid published the report, Counting the Cost 2019. It identifies fifteen of the most destructive droughts, floods, fires, typhoons and cyclones of 2019, each of which caused damage of over $1 billion. Seven of the events cost more than $10 billion each. [Reliefweb]

World:

¶ “EGPE Switches On 50 MW Of Wind In Galicia” • Spanish utility Endesa SA announced that its renewables unit Enel Green Power Espana has connected to the grid 50 MW of wind farms in Spain’s Lugo province. The company invested €61 million ($67.6 million) in the 21 turbines installed. The wind farms are expected to produce 185 GWh per year. [Renewables Now]

Endesa’s Enel Green Power Espana wind parks

¶ “At Over ₹844 Million, DISCOM Dues To Power Generators In October Up 54% YOY” • Outstanding dues owed to power generators by distribution companies (DISCOMs) at the end of October 2019 stood at ₹844.45 billion ($11.83 billion), up by ₹297.76 billion ($4.17 billion) or 54% from the same period last year. [Mercom India]

¶ “Progress In Estonian-Latvian Joint Project For Renewable Energy” • The Estonian government made a decision to review issue of a construction permit to create a wind turbine park in the Gulf of Riga. This would allow Estonia and Latvia to implement a joint renewable energy project, according to an Eesti Energia representative. [bnn-news.com]

Wind turbines (SIPA | Scanpix)

¶ “Taiwan Sees Increasing Renewable Energy Generation, Say MOEA” • Taiwan recorded renewable energy generation of 13 GWh during January-October 2019, increasing 22.4% on year and taking up 5.6% of total electricity output, according to the Ministry of Economic Affairs. In the first nine months of 2019, 1.340 GW of PVs were approved. [Digitimes]

¶ “Australian Miners Hit By Lowest Thermal Coal Price In More Than A Decade” • Australian coal exporters have experienced the biggest annual drop in thermal coal prices in more than a decade over the course of 2019. This raises doubts about the industry’s projections that demand will grow. The spot price of thermal coal is down more than a third. [The Guardian]

Price of coal (Darren England | AAP)

¶ “Removal Of Spent Nuclear Fuel At Fukushima Daiichi Delayed Up To Five Years” • The Japanese government decided to delay the removal of spent fuel from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant’s No 1 and No 2 reactors by up to five years, casting doubt on whether it can stick to its schedule to dismantle the crippled complex. [The Japan Times]

US:

¶ “Renewables Account For 100% Of Oct 2019 Capacity Additions In US” • The US put into service 722 MW of new power capacity in October, 2019, and all of it was renewable, the latest monthly report by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission shows. For January through October, slightly less than 50% of new capacity has been natural gas. [Renewables Now]

Wind turbines in Texas (Xcel Energy)

¶ “Despite SUV Craze, Tesla Model 3 Dominates US Luxury Vehicle Market” • Of the the top-selling luxury vehicle in the US in the first half of 2019, only two were sedans. The Tesla Model 3, however, beat the others in the field by a huge margin. The only other sedan on the top 10 list was the Mercedes C-Class, and rest were all SUVs. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “Tri-State Tells Colorado Regulators They Lack Jurisdiction In Contract Dispute With Electric Co-ops” • Two Colorado utilities filed complaints with state regulators in November, saying Tri-State won’t name the amount of money it would take to get out of their contracts. Now Tri-State is telling the regulators they have no authority in the case. [The Denver Post]

Have a magically inspiring day.

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