October 8 Energy News

October 8, 2019

Opinion:

¶ “Coal Finished As Renewable Costs Crash” • Bloomberg just published another stark reminder of the shifting landscape for energy generation. Fossil fuels have a limited time as viable sources of energy, because of economics. Solar+Batteries are the “killer app,” extremely scalable once they reach an acceptable cost, and we are reaching it. [MacroBusiness]

Please click on the image to enlarge it

¶ “Are Mortgage-Backed Securities Storm Proof?” • According to some investors, hurricanes and flooding pose a far larger threat than is being priced into mortgage securities. A key culprit may be outdated flood maps, meaning far fewer people are required to have flood insurance than are at risk, the investors and researchers say. [DSNews.com]

Science and Technology:

¶ “Ghost Forests Are Visceral Examples Of The Advance of Climate Change” • Ghost forests can result from rising seas. Swaths of dead, white, trees are created when salty water moves into forested areas, first slowing, and eventually halting, the growth of new trees. That means that when old trees die, there aren’t replacements. [TIME]

Ghost forest in Maryland (Luke Piotrowski | Newsy)

World:

¶ “Ben & Jerry’s Maker To Slash New Plastic Use By Nearly 400,000 Tons Per Year” • Consumer goods giant Unilever, maker of Ben & Jerry’s and Dove, committed to halving its use of new plastic by 2025. Its goal is to use no more than 350,000 tonnes (386,000 tons) of new plastic each year by 2025, down from around 700,000 tonnes in 2018. [CNN]

¶ “EVs To Revolutionize Postal Services, And More” • Parcel and Postal Expo, the largest event for courier services in Europe, is taking place in Amsterdam. This year, the Expo is putting a new emphasis on e-mobility, and this includes not only EVs, but also charging infrastructure. The new EVs range up from the smallest delivery vehicles. [CleanTechnica]

Author on a Chinese electric delivery vehicle

¶ “A French City Introduces Free Public Transportation” • Now known as an industrial city, Dunkirk wants to change its image to one with a green future. Its leaders want it to have transportation powered by green electricity. One key is a free public transit system that will connect Dunkirk to its neighboring cities and towns. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “Over €2 Billion Invested In Renewable Energy In Ukraine” • In January to September 2019, over €2 billion was invested in developing renewable energy in Ukraine, according to the State Agency for Energy Efficiency and Energy Saving. Renewable capacity rose from about 2,300 MW at the end of 2018 to about 5,000 MW as of October 1, 2019. [Ukrinform]

Solar array

¶ “‘Significant Uncertainty’ Over Wind Outlook” • According to WindEurope’s new ‘Wind Energy Outlook to 2023’ report, forecasting growth of Europe’s wind capacity is subject to “significant uncertainty.” The study has found that annual volumes of new wind capacity up to 2023 could range between 13 GW and 22 GW. [reNEWS]

¶ “Australia Could Aim For 700% Renewables, ARENA Boss” • Australia’s energy minister thinks having 20% of electricity come from solar and wind is too much. Labor wants to get to 50% by 2030. But Australia’s chief scientist, Alan Finkel is suggesting a figure of 700%, a goal supported by the Australian Renewable Energy Agency. [RenewEconomy]

Wind farm for Western Australia

¶ “Total Turns Sod On 52 MW Of Solar In Japan” • Total has begun construction of a 52-MW PV plant in Japan. Total Solar International, the utility-scale solar business of the oil and gas player, is building the solar power plant in Osato, in the Miyagi prefecture. The facility is expected to start producing power in 2021. [reNEWS]

¶ “Solar Power Is The Red-Hot Growth Area In Oil-Rich Alberta” • Solar power is beating expectations in Alberta, where the renewable energy source is poised to expand dramatically in the coming years as international power companies invest in it. Fresh capital is being deployed in the Alberta’s electricity generation sector. [Financial Post]

Sunrise near Edmonton (Max Maudie | Postmedia)

US:

¶ “Frito-Lay Ditches Diesel In Favor Of A Renewable-Powered Fleet At Its Modesto Facility” • PepsiCo is replacing the fleet of diesel freight vehicles that service its Frito-Lay plant in Modesto, California with zero-emission and near-zero emission vehicles. Frito-Lay is getting 15 Tesla class 8 trucks, 6 BYD class 6 trucks, a PV array, and a lot more. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “Miami-Dade Locks In Order For 33 Electric Buses From Proterra” • Miami-Dade is taking a big first step to electrified transit with the purchase of 33 fully electric buses from Proterra. It is the largest purchase of electric buses to date on the US east coast. Each bus reduces CO₂ emissions by 230,000 pounds annually, compared to diesel. [CleanTechnica]

Electric bus charging station (Proterra image)

¶ “Target To Achieve 25% Of Its Renewable Electricity Goal By End Of 2019” • Back in June, the Minneapolis-based retailer announced that it had set a 100% renewable electricity goal, which would see all its stores in the US running on clean power by 2030. By the end of this year, it will have accomplished 25% of this mission. [Hydrogen Fuel News]

¶ “Five States Now Have Programs To Help Struggling Nuclear Power Plants” • The DOE’s Energy Information Administration reported that Ohio joined Connecticut, Illinois, New Jersey, and New York in implementing programs to provide financial compensation and other assistance to struggling nuclear power plant operators. [Interesting Engineering]

Have an appropriately cheerful day.

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