September 21 Energy News

September 21, 2017

Opinion:

¶ “Climate Devastation In Sequoia National Park” • Surveying the desiccated forest with tourists from all over the world, I felt as though we were among the last people able to enjoy the sequoia as a forest. The desertification of this area seems to be progressing rapidly. The trees might be able to adapt, but many have died already. [CleanTechnica]

Devastation among the sequoia

¶ “Epic – Wind Turbines On Steroids, + Idiotic Clean Energy Forecasts (Charts)” • Bloomberg New Energy Finance’s Future of Energy Summit just wrapped up in London. In his keynote presentation, Michael Liebreich stimulated many thoughts about renewable energy, and about far it has exceeded many industry forecasts. [CleanTechnica]

World:

¶ Following in the wake of initiatives such as RE100 and EP100, ten big-name businesses launched EV100 to fast-track the uptake of electric vehicles and accompanying infrastructure. Members of EV100 commit to transitioning from diesel and petrol vehicles to electric vehicles, and installing battery charging infrastructure, by 2030. [CleanTechnica]

Electric car fleet (Image via ecartestdrives)

¶ Reports from Nicaragua say that President Daniel Ortega has confirmed his country will finally sign the Paris Climate Agreement. This means the US and Syria would be the only two countries in the world that are not active parties to it. The Nicaraguan position had been that the Paris Climate Agreement it did not go far enough. [CleanTechnica]

¶ France is set to become Europe’s second biggest generator of electricity from wind power by 2030, overtaking the UK and Spain and only behind Germany, thanks to policies being put in place by its government, industry association WindEurope’s chief executive said. He rates the French outlook for wind power projects as the best in Europe. [Reuters]

Wind turbines near Marseille (Reuters | Jean-Paul Pelissier)

¶ A survey conducted by the European Commission in March found that 92% of European Union citizens consider climate change a serious problem, with 74% calling it “very serious.” An impressive 89% of Europeans believe that it is important for their own national government to set targets to increase renewable energy use by 2030. [CleanTechnica]

¶ In April 2016, Pakistan signed a $20 billion deal for liquefied natural gas from Qatar, 2.75 metric tons per year for 15 years. The price is 13.3% of the prevailing price of the a barrel of Brent Oil, used as a benchmark. Today the going spot price for LNG is around 25% less than the contract rate. At that rate, Pakistan is losing over $1 million per day. [Newsline]

LNG carrier

¶ India can surpass its target of installing 175 GW of renewable energy capacity by 2022, the New and Renewable Energy Secretary Anand Kumar said. Though India will use offshore wind energy and large hydro-electric projects, Kumar cited lower prices of solar and wind power, as he said he expected India to exceed the target. [The Hans India]

¶ The £173 million Snetterton Renewable Energy Plant, situated in Norfolk, officially opened last week. It will generate an estimated 44 MW by burning straw, woodchips, and miscanthus. Miscanthus is a perennial bamboo-like plant that thrives on unproductive land, with the potential to yield 15 tonnes per hectare. [Norfolk Eastern Daily Press]

Crop of miscanthus (Photo: Antony Kelly)

¶ In the latest Renewable Energy Index, Australian large-scale power project construction work has broken through 10,000 jobs. Meanwhile rooftop solar PV installs almost broke 100 MW for the month. Given they will deliver something close to $180 million in bill savings the large lift in solar should not come as much surprise. [RenewEconomy]

US:

¶ Every General Motors manufacturing plant in Ohio and Indiana will now be completely powered by wind energy thanks to a 200-MW power purchase agreement. The automaker is now the sole user of the 100-MW Northwest Ohio Wind Farm, and another 100 MW will come from the HillTopper Wind Project in Illinois. [Power Engineering Magazine]

Wind farm

¶ Officials celebrated the opening of a landfill gas-to-energy plant in Novato, California. It will provide renewable electricity to customers in four Bay Area counties. The $14.5 million state-of-the-art renewable energy power plant uses methane gas produced at a landfill to power two reciprocating engines that generate 3.9 MW of electricity. [Patch.com]

¶ Hurricane Maria knocked out power across the island of Puerto Rico, home to 3.5 million people, officials have said. The head of the disaster management agency said none of the customers of Puerto Rico’s Electric Power Authority had power. The US National Hurricane Center said “catastrophic” flooding was sweeping parts of the island. [BBC]

San Juan after Hurricane Maria

¶ The US Climate Alliance, a coalition of states backing the Paris Climate Accord, announced that North Carolina had joined in defiance of President Trump’s decision to exit the United Nations pact. Washington Gov Jay Inslee said, “If we were a country, we would be the third-largest economy of any nation in the world.” [Washington Examiner]

¶ Georgia’s Public Service Commission set hearings to determine whether the Vogtle nuclear facility will be completed. A decision should come in February. After two reactors at VC Summers were abandoned, Georgia Power Company told the regulators it wanted to complete the two-reactor project. Vogtle is now the sole new nuclear construction in the US. [The Nerve]

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