June 28 Energy News

June 28, 2016

Opinion:

¶ “Diablo Canyon’s closure is good news for energy and the
earth” • The nuclear plant’s closure is important for the future of energy generation and for the health of the earth. The agreement to close the plant could also serve as a positive example for other states. [The San Luis Obispo Tribune]

Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant. Joe Johnston jjohnston@thetribunenews.com

Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant. Joe Johnston jjohnston@thetribunenews.com

Science and Technology:

¶ Four years ago, Professor Peter Wadhams, head of the Polar Ocean Physics Group at Cambridge University, said the Arctic Ocean could well be free of sea ice within only a few years. Some considered his statement controversial. Now, it appears that he may have been right. [CleanTechnica]

World:

¶ Scotland’s carbon emission level in 2014 was around 46% lower than its emission levels in 1990, meaning that the country has managed to achieve its 2020 target of 42% lower emissions, and even beat it, a full 6 years early. Recent data show a year-on-year decrease of 12.5%. [CleanTechnica]

Scottish wind farm

Scottish wind farm

¶ A new European research project coordinated by DTU Energy will develop innovative electrolysis technologies to convert excess renewable electricity into methane, which can be easily stored in the existing natural gas grid. The methane can be distributed in natural gas pipelines. [I-Connect007]

¶ Denham Capital and GreenWish Partners have signed an agreement to finance and develop 600 MW of renewable energy projects across Africa. The companies will target sub-Saharan countries and markets where renewable energy projects are competitive without subsidies. [CleanTechies]

Kengen wind power plant. Photo by Rotsee2. CC BY-SA 3.0. Wikimedia Commons.

Kengen wind power plant. Photo by Rotsee2.
CC BY-SA 3.0. Wikimedia Commons.

¶ EDF Group announced the commissioning of Ensemble Eolien Catalan wind farm, a 96-MW facility at Languedoc-Roussillon-Midi-Pyrénées. The wind farm has “stealth” wind turbines, the world’s first solution for interference from wind farms for weather radar. [CleanTechnology News]

¶ Saft has clinched a deal to supply its Uptimax battery systems at E.ON’s Amrumbank West offshore wind farm. The 302-MW wind farm’s remote location meant backup batteries were required for reliable operation without the need for regular maintenance visits. [SeeNews Renewables]

Offshore wind turbines. Image: Teun van den Dries / Shutterstock.com

Offshore wind turbines.
Image: Teun van den Dries / Shutterstock.com

¶ This week, the US and Mexico will commit to joining Canada in boosting their use of wind, solar, and other carbon-free sources of electricity, helping the North American group meet an ambitious goal of generating at least 50% of its energy from “clean” sources by 2025. [BOE Report]

¶ Diesel fuel has long been the primary source of energy in Arctic communities. Above all else, it is reliable. But its reliability has high logistical, financial and environmental costs. A WWF-Canada report shows these sacrifices in the name of reliability may no longer be necessary. [Huffington Post Canada]

Nunavut (AP Photo / Ted S. Warren)

Nunavut (AP Photo / Ted S. Warren)

¶ The UK’s nuclear future could be left on the chopping block by the country’s shock referendum vote to quit the EU. One government energy adviser said the Hinkley Point C project, which is expected to cost upwards of £20 billion, is now “extremely unlikely” to be completed. [Ars Technica UK]

US:

¶ Gulf Power filed a petition asking the Florida Public Service Commission to approve adding 94 MW of wind energy from the Kingfisher Wind farm in Oklahoma. The diversification of the energy sources reduces price fluctuations, including some caused by natural disasters. [Pensacola News Journal]

Kingfisher Wind farm in Oklahoma (Photo: Special to the News Journal)

Kingfisher Wind farm in Oklahoma
(Photo: Special to the News Journal)

¶ Volkswagen has reportedly reached a $15 billion settlement with US car owners after admitting it cheated emission tests. The deal would offer to repair or buy back the affected diesel vehicles and pay owners compensation. The US settlement is still pending approval by a judge. [BBC]
($15 billion is about 23% of VW’s market capitalization.)

¶ The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission affirmed the right of the Delta-Montrose Electric Authority, a distribution cooperative, to buy electricity outside of purchases from Tri-State Generation & Transmission Association. It rejected a fee the G&T utility sought for the lost revenue. [Utility Dive]

Fort Mill solar trackers

Fort Mill solar trackers

¶ In Pennsylvania, the Lancaster County Solid Waste Management Authority contracted with a Dutch company that specializes in processing municipal waste-to-energy ash to sell recovered metals at premium prices. A $14 million facility will be built next to the Frey Farm Landfill. [PennLive.com]

¶ California regulators are expected to decide whether to drop environmental objections to the state’s last nuclear power plant in return for its promised early closing. Their vote is one of a number of regulatory hurdles facing the agreement to shut down plant ahead of schedule. [Greenfield Daily Reporter]

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