December 5 Energy News

December 5, 2022

Science and Technology:

¶ “New Ultra-Fast Charging System With Integrated Battery Storage And Large Screens” • ADS-TEC Energy added a new battery-based charging system to its existing lineup of charging solutions. ChargePost uses an integrated battery to operate on existing power connections without the need to extend the existing grid. [CleanTechnica]

ChagePost (ADS-TEC Energy image)

¶ “Recycling To Close Synthetic Fabric Window On Fossil Energy Stakeholders” • As the decarbonization trend accelerates, fossil energy stakeholders have counted on petrochemicals to maintain a foothold in the global economy. Synthetic fabrics offer one such niche. But expansion opportunities are limited as recycling picks up steam. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “’Weather Whiplash’ Could Be a Disturbing New Normal in a Weird, Warming World” • In northern New Mexico, the year began with months of unseasonal heat, dryness and extreme wind that fueled the largest wildfire of the year in the lower 48 states. Then, the annual monsoon rains dumped nearly twice as much moisture as the previous year. [CNET]

Monsoon coming (Chaz McGregor, Unsplash)

World:

¶ “EU Must Act Over Distortions From US Climate Plan” • The EU must address “distortions” created by a $430 billion US plan to incentivise climate-friendly technologies, the bloc’s chief says. Some EU members criticised the US Inflation Reduction Act, raising fears of a trade war. There are concerns that tax breaks may lure away or disadvantage EU businesses. [BBC]

¶ “Oil Prices Rise As Cap On Russian Crude Looms” • Oil prices rose on Monday after an agreement by the G7 group of nations and its allies to cap the price of Russian oil at $60 (£49) a barrel. Brent crude added around 0.7% to above $86 in Asia trading. The move, which about to come into force, raises Western pressure on Russia over the invasion of Ukraine. [BBC]

Oil tanker (Fred, Unsplash)

¶ “Italy’s EV Slump Is Far From Over – Plugins Were At 8.3% In October” • October 2022 was another month of misery for Italy’s once promising EV market. In stark contrast with the rest of Europe’s main auto arenas, which keep making strides in electric mobility adoption, the Mediterranean country is still in the midst of an identity crisis. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “EU Agrees To Include Shipping In Emissions Trading System” • The EU Emissions Trading System is the oldest and largest program of its type, but it has had a big weakness. It covered power stations and factories but did not cover emissions from shipping. In a landmark accord last week, negotiators agreed to correct that oversight. [CleanTechnica]

Container ship (Maersk image)

¶ “Major Businesses Urge Government To Power Wind And Solar Investment” • Tesco, Morrisons, M&S, the Co-op Group, Central Co-op, and Midcounties Co-operative, along with Community Energy England, have joined forces to call on the Government to “green the energy grid” by powering investment in renewable energy. [The Co-operative]

¶ “Airbus Looking At India For Green Hydrogen Supplies For Its Ambitious Zero-Emission Aircraft” • European aerospace major Airbus is looking to source green hydrogen from markets like India, Australia, and Latin America as part of its decarbonisation efforts, a senior company official said. Airbus will use the fuel for hydrogen-powered airplanes. [Zee News]

Airbus plane (Daniel Eledut, Unsplash)

¶ “Nuclear Off Table As States Seek Power Fix” • South Australia’s premier, Peter Malinauskas, left the door open to nuclear, as he seeks to advocate its safety. Prime Minister Anthony Albanese and Environment Minister Tanya Plibersek were quick to shoot their Labor colleague down, pointing out nuclear energy will not work out financially. [Great Lakes Advocate]

¶ “NSW Tops Renewable Energy Superpower Scorecard For First Time” • The winner of the Renewable Superpower Scorecard for this year is New South Wales. The state implemented Renewable Energy Zones and industrial precincts plans, issued First nations guidelines for energy projects, and allocated $1.2 billion to fast track transmission infrastructure. [Renew Economy]

Wind turbine blades (Acciona image)

¶ “Iran Starts Work On Second Nuclear Power Plant” • Iran has begun work on a 300-MW nuclear power project in the southern Khuzestan province. It will be the country’s second nuclear reactor project. The project is projected to take eight years and cost $2 billion to build, the state-run Islamic Republic News Agency reported. [The National]

US:

¶ “The Great Solar Panel Tariff Debate Heats Up” • The Biden administration is putting $37 billion into incentives to help US companies manufacture the products needed to fulfill the US renewable energy goal using American workers and materials wherever possible. But the US needs foreign PVs and does not want to get them from China. [CleanTechnica]

Solar PV array (Raphael Cruz, Unsplash)

¶ “Activists Say DTE’s Plan Won’t Meet Michigan’s Renewable Energy Goals” • Michigan regulators have set long-term targets for emission-reductions by the state’s power utilities. They are to have carbon neutral power in 2050. But clean-energy advocates are concerned that one company, DTE Energy, is not on track to meet its goals. [Public News Service]

¶ “Windar Renovables Transfers First Vineyard Transition Piece” • The first of the 62 transition pieces for the 800-MW Vineyard Wind project has been transferred from Windar Renovables’ offshore facilities to the port of Aviles in Spain. Avandgrid, a subsidiary of Iberdrola, is developing the wind farm off the coast of Massachusetts. [reNews]

Have a perfectly agreeable day.

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