April 8 Energy News

April 8, 2022

World:

¶ “This Incredibly Potent Planet-Warming Gas Just Set Another Record For The Second Year In A Row” • Methane, the second largest contributor to the human-caused climate crisis after carbon dioxide, increased in the atmosphere by the largest amount in 2021 since measurements began nearly 40 years ago, according to NOAA. [CNN]

Liquified natural gas tanker (Joshua J Cotten, Unsplash)

¶ “NREL Identifies Abundant Renewable Energy Resources As Key To Mexico’s Clean Energy Ambitions” • The US DOE’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory released an in-depth report on the potential for developing clean energy in Mexico. Mexico is replete with solar and wind resources and has some potential for new geothermal and hydropower. [NREL]

¶ “Pacific Institute Water Conflict Chronology Updated” • Over the past few years, severe droughts in India and Iran have led to a big increase in conflicts over access to irrigation and domestic water and to demonstrations against water diversions from one community to another. Violence over water resources continues to worsen. [CleanTechnica]

Water (Manki Kim, Unsplash)

¶ “Mitsui To Invest In $1.35 Billion Renewable Energy Project In India” • Japan’s Mitsui has agreed to make an investment in a large-scale 1.3-GW renewable energy project that India’s ReNew Power is developing. The project will consist of three newly built wind farms (900 MW in total) and one solar plus battery storage farm (400 MW plus up to 100 MWh). [Energy Voice]

¶ “Fortescue Buys Cattle Stations For 5-GW Renewable Energy Hub” • Fortescue Future Industries bought three cattle stations in Western Australia. It plans to use them for renewable energy to decarbonize its mining business and export green hydrogen and green ammonia. The stations will continue to run cattle, but their primary product will be renewable energy. [PV Magazine]

Homestead in Western Australia (Yewenyi, CC-BY-SA 3.0)

UK:

¶ “Boris Johnson Defends Plan Amid Cost Of Living Crisis” • UK consumers are facing huge increases in energy bills after the Russian invasion of Ukraine pushed gas prices even higher. The PM has defended the government’s new energy strategy, after criticism from his political foes that it does little to help people struggling with soaring bills. [BBC]

¶ “REA Slams UK Energy Strategy As ‘Wholly Inadequate’” • The Association for Renewable Energy and Clean Technology (REA) has branded the UK Government’s Energy Security Strategy as “wholly inadequate.” The REA said that nuclear power is too expensive. Instead of nuclear, a focus should be put on onshore windpower and microgrids. [reNews]

Wind turbines and hay (William DeHoogh, Unsplash)

¶ “UK Energy Strategy: Here’s How New Nuclear Will Be Blocked In Scotland” • The SNP Government says it will halt any attempts to bring new nuclear power developments to Scotland. Scottish energy secretary Michael Matheson says the government in Holyrood remains firmly against nuclear power stations, and will use its planning powers to stop them. [Press and Journal]

US:

¶ “19 Named Storms Expected This Hurricane Season, Above Average But Becoming More Common” • After two consecutive years of exhausting the hurricane name list, forecasters predict 19 named storms this hurricane season, five more than normal. Nine are expected to become hurricanes, and four are expected to become major hurricanes. [CNN]

Eye of Hurricane Florence, 2018 (NASA image)

¶ “Puerto Rico Crews Scramble To Restore Power After Island-Wide Outage” • Electric service restoration efforts were still underway Thursday evening in Puerto Rico, a utility company said, a day after the start of an island-wide outage that left many people in the dark overnight and prompted school cancellations and other interruptions. [CNN]

¶ “Helping US Utilities Target Grid Resilience” • The US power grids are at the center of a digitalization transformation leading to decarbonizing all economic sectors, increasing distributed renewable generation, and electrifying consumption. The ultimate goal is to improve grid resilience, sustainability, and reliability in the US. [CleanTechnica]

Grid operations (Photo courtesy of Enel)

¶ “Proposed Law In New York Allows Customer-Generators To Donate Credit To Low-Income Families” • A proposed law in New York state aims to allow residential solar customers to donate energy credits to low-income families. The law would broaden the benefits of solar to provide for low income people who might not have solar panels. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “Environmental Monitoring Priorities For Offshore Wind” • While the need for this transition is becoming only more urgent, for the full potential of offshore wind to be realized, we can and must ensure that all offshore windpower in the US is developed in a way that minimizes impacts on our vulnerable marine ecosystems. [CleanTechnica]

Offshore windfarm (Guillaume Baviere, CC-BY-SA 2.0)

¶ “Electric Vehicles Could Save North Carolinians $92 Billion, Avoid 679 Hospital Visits” • North Carolina can save $92 billion and avoid 679 hospital visits by transitioning to zero-emission EVs and trucks, a report says. The report, “North Carolina Transportation Electrification Roadmap,” was commissioned by the NRDC and prepared by ERM. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “State Regulators Approve Construction Of Wisconsin’s Largest Renewable Energy Plant In Dane County” • The Public Service Commission has approved construction of the state’s largest renewable energy plant in Dane County. The Koshkonong Solar Energy Center would have 300 MW of solar capacity and 165 MW of battery storage. [Wisconsin Public Radio]

Have a properly prepossessing day.

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