June 1 Energy News

June 1, 2020

Opinion:

¶ “How Cities Might Change If We Worked From Home More” • Many people now work from home. Major tech companies say they are open to their staff working from home permanently. Employees are coming to realize remote working is not only possible but, in some cases, preferable. A shift to a new way of working might already be under way. [BBC]

Tverskaya Street in Moscow on May 9 (Reuters)

¶ “What Will Coronavirus Do To Renewable Energy?” • Before the Covid-19 pandemic, renewable energy was growing, but not fast enough to meet the Paris Agreement’s carbon reduction goals, let alone to deal with climate change. Now, the economic shock of Covid-19 is slowing the growth of renewables, at least temporarily. [Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists]

¶ “Finally There Is Real Movement On Australia’s Climate Policy But Time Isn’t On Our Side” • If speed weren’t a factor, we could probably rely on the market to incentivise the uptake of green technology at its own pace. Battery costs are down and new renewables generate power more cheaply than fossil fuels. But time is running out. [The Guardian]

Solar panels (Carly Earl | The Guardian)

Science and Technology:

¶ “Marine Species Are Moving Towards The Poles Six Times Faster Than Terrestrials Amid Climate Change” • Greenhouse gases have been increasing from human activity exponentially. One of the biggest impacts on species is migration toward cooler temperatures. A study compares detailed differences between marine species and land animals. [Science Times]

World:

¶ “NIO Completes More Than 500,000 Battery Swaps” • NIO is a Chinese electric car maker. One of the things that sets it apart is its focus on battery swapping technology, which has advantages aside from speed. NIO has 136 automated swap stations along many of China’s busiest highways. It has now performed over 500,000 battery swaps. [CleanTechnica]

NIO battery swap station (Image credit: NIO Power)

¶ “West Africa: Hydro To Support Solar And Wind In Smart Renewable Grid” • A study published in the journal Nature Sustainability maps the potential of solar-wind-water strategies for West Africa, a region where power grids are expected to expand. The study explores how hydropower can firm solar and windpower in a climate-friendly manner. [ESI Africa]

¶ “Serbia’s New Energy Solutions To Build 220-MW Wind Farm” • New Energy Solutions, a Serbian management consultancy for renewable energy, is to build a 220-MW wind farm in Kovačica, a document posted on the website of Kovačica municipality shows. The wind farm is to have 31 turbines, each with a 7 MW capacity, and a power substantion. [Renewables Now]

Kovačica wind farm (Source: Windpark Kovačica)

¶ “Power Consumption Dips 14% To 103 BU In May Due To Coronavirus Lockdown” • In India, Power consumption in May declined by 14.16% to 103.02 billion units (kWh) compared to 120.02 BU a year ago, mainly due to low demand during the pandemic lockdown. But the May number is a rise from the 22.65% decline for April. [ETEnergyworld.com]

¶ “Siemens Gamesa Confirms Order For 496-MW Offshore Wind Plant” • Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy received a firm order from Ailes Marine, an Iberdrola affiliate, for 62 SG 8.0-167 DD offshore wind turbines for the 496-MW Bay of Saint Brieuc offshore wind plant in France. The order includes a 10-year maintenance agreement. [Saurenergy]

Offshore wind farm

¶ “Renewables Gain Investors As Some Flee Oil, Gas, And Coal” • The global fossil fuel sectors are taking a beating, as the supply far outstrips falling demand. Investors seeking safer havens could drive growth in renewable energy even as the solar and wind energy sectors try to weather the economic downturn caused by the coronavirus pandemic. [Power Magazine]

¶ “Enel Wins 106.3 MW Of Wind, Hydro Projects In Italy” • Enel SpA announced that Enel Green Power was awarded 106.3 MW of capacity in Italian tenders held by the Italian state-owned energy service system operator. The auctions targeted 500 MW of new wind and solar projects and 98.5 MW for renovations of existing plants. [Renewables Now]

Endesa’s Enel Green Power Espana wind parks

¶ “Questions Emerge Over The Need For A Japanese Nuclear Reprocessing Plant” • Japanese nuclear regulators announced that the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant had met new safety regulations, taking a crucial step toward becoming operational. But now, some people are questioning the need for the project to be continued at all. [NHK World]

US:

¶ “Empire State Building Reduces Carbon Emissions By 40% With Energy Saving Upgrades” • When it was built, during the depression, the Empire State Building projected a message of hope by keeping every room lit for all to see. Today, the energy retrofits the building has had reduce its emissions, enough to show a new hope for the future. [CleanTechnica]

Empire State Building (Image credit: esbnyc.com)

¶ “Edgewater Coal Plant Closure Signals A Move Towards Renewable Energy” • By the end of 2022, Alliant Energy, based in Madison, Wisconsin, will shutter the Edgewater coal plant in Sheboygan. The company said in a press release that it hopes to transition to renewable energy, and avoid long-term costs for current customers. [Wisconsin Examiner]

¶ “Cities ‘Could Generate Hundreds Of Times More Solar Power Than They Do Today’” • While applauding the rooftop solar progress of dozens of cities, a report from Environment Texas offers policy options for further progress. Per capita solar leaders are Honolulu, San Diego, Albuquerque, San Jose and Burlington, Vermont. [pv magazine USA]

Have thoroughly pleasing day.

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