June 28 Energy News

June 28, 2019

Opinion:

¶ “Will Russia Survive The Coming Energy Transition?” • A new global energy reality is emerging. Hydrocarbons have propelled mankind through the second stage of the industrial revolution, beyond coal and into outer space, but the age of hydrocarbons is drawing to a close. The stone age did not end because we ran out of stones. It is the same with oil and gas. [Forbes]

Pipeline (Pixabay image)

Science and Technology:

¶ “Highview Launches Modular Storage Device” • Cryogenic energy storage developer Highview Power has produced a scalable version of its technology to unlock new demand. The CryoBattery, which it says can be located anywhere, can achieve a levelised cost of storage of $140/MWh for a 200-MW/2-GWh system. [reNEWS]

¶ “Alice, 9-Seat Electric Airplane, Gets Its 1st Buyer – Cape Air” • Eviation unveiled the first “fully operational” Alice, an electric airplane commuter, at the Paris Air Show. Eviation also received an order from Cape Air, its first customer. Cape Air began with flights between Boston and Provincetown in 1989, but now flies in many parts of the world. [CleanTechnica]

Alice (Eviation image)

World:

¶ “CATL Plans Massive Increase In European Battery Production” • Chinese battery cell maker CATL decided earlier this year to invest €240 million in a battery factory in Erfurt, Germany. Now, the company says it will increase its investment in battery production and research in Europe to €1.8 billion, according to a report by Electrive. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “BYD Joint Venture To Launch New Electric Bus Production Facility In India” • Olectra-BYD, the joint venture between BYD Auto and India’s Olectra Greentech, has announced plans to set up its second factory to manufacture electric buses. The factory is expected to be located in north India, and is expected to be set up by 2021. [CleanTechnica]

BYD electric bus (Photo: Kyle Field | CleanTechnica)

¶ “Renewables Driving ‘Fundamental Change’ As Victoria Leaves Coal Behind” • Just as the Australian Energy Market Operator report calls for new investment to support renewable energy zones, Victoria’s electricity market is undergoing a fundamental shift away from the coal-heavy Latrobe Valley region and toward distributed renewables. [RenewEconomy]

¶ “How Tasmania is transforming into a renewable energy powerhouse” • Two big projects are helping Tasmania become the “battery of the nation.” One is to double its renewable energy capacity over a 10-to-15-year period from 2,500 MW to around 5,000 MW. The other is to build another submarine link to Australia’s mainland. [create digital]

Hydro Tasmania dam

¶ “Scotland Producing Record Renewable Energy Output” • Scotland produced a record amount of renewable energy in the first quarter of 2019. A total of 8,877 GWh of green electricity were generated in the first quarter of this year, 17% more than Q1 of 2018. The bulk of this power, 5,792 GWh, came from onshore wind farms. [The National]

US:

¶ “New York City Declares A Climate Emergency, The First Us City With More Than A Million Residents To Do So” • In an effort to mobilize local and national responses to stall global warming, the New York City Council passed legislation declaring a climate emergency. It’s the largest city in the US, with over 8.62 million inhabitants. [CNN]

New York City (Hans Lienhart, Wikimedia Commons)

¶ “New Report: Retire Coal, Choose Renewables To Save Billions In Colorado” • Independent analysis by energy consulting firm Strategen shows that Colorado’s coal-burning power plants are economically unviable, when they are compared to renewable resources. It says renewables could save the state’s customers millions of dollars. [Windpower Engineering]

¶ “UCS Calls Curtailment Of Renewable Energy An Opportunity, Not A Problem” • Curtailment of electricity occurs when there is not enough demand for the available supply, so some generation has to be halted. The California Independent System Operator proposed eight strategies for putting excess renewable energy to work. [CleanTechnica]

Curtailments in California by month (CAISO image)

¶ “Report Shows More Than Half Of MidAmerican Energy Comes From Renewable Resources” • MidAmerican energy announced that 51.4% of their energy came from renewable resources last year. MidAmerican Energy expects it to continue increase its share of renewable energy, without seeking rate increases. [KCHA News]

¶ “It’s Official: Maine To Go 80% Renewable By 2030” • Maine Governor Janet Mills (D) signed a trifecta of bills to move the state towards a clean energy future, including adding 375 MW of distributed solar by mid-2024. Also, the state’s utilities are required to get 50% of their power from qualified renewable energy sources by 2030. [pv magazine]

Signing ceremony (Image: Office of Maine Governor Janet Mills)

¶ “Massachusetts Regulators Approve State’s Largest Clean Energy Procurement” • The Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities approved contracts authorizing utilities to buy 9,554,940 MWh annually from Hydro-Quebec. The Sierra Club, however, questioned the wisdom of relying on Canadian hydropower to address the state’s climate goals. [Utility Dive]

¶ “Nuclear Bailout Bill Undercuts Green Power, Critics Say” • While a Senate proposal to save Ohio’s two nuclear power plants would keep a mandate for more renewable power, it would likely harm long-term green investment, critics argued. The revised bill would now require just 8.5% of the power be from renewable sources by 2025. [Toledo Blade]

Have a perfectly fantastic day.

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