February 6 Energy News

February 6, 2019

Opinion:

¶ “Why Oil Companies Have Suddenly Gone Missing In The Bond Market” • The US shale oil revolution was built on cheap capital from the bond markets. Frackers used tons of borrowed money to make enormous technological advances in drilling, and that sent oil output skyrocketing. But that trend has broken down in recent months. [CNN]

Pumpjack (Photo: Daniel Acker | Bloomberg via Getty Images)

¶ “Ten Mind-Numbing Figures That Define PG&E’s Bankruptcy” • The Pacific Gas and Electric process could take years, with the costs to the company, its consumers, and ancillary industries being almost mind-numbing. It could cost up to $150 billion for PG&E just to comply with court orders, and that’s only one outrageous figure. [Motley Fool]

Science and Technology:

¶ “Does The Climate Shape Social Change?” • Locked inside the wood of Japan’s hinoki trees is an unprecedented 2,600 year-long record of rainfall patterns that are helping to piece together how weather shapes society. By studying ratios of isotopes of oxygen in the cellulose of the logs, scientists can correlate changes in climate and society. [BBC]

Cedar logs

World:

¶ “Volkswagen Continues To Spend Most Of Its R&D Budget On Fossil Fuel Transportation” • While it is exciting that the Volkswagen Group plans to have 50 electrified models in its lineup by 2030, that has to be balanced against another statistic. Over 300 models are under the VW group umbrella, and 250 will not be not electric. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “Japanese Energy Companies Scrap 2-GW Coal Project” • Three Japanese energy companies announced that they have decided to scrap plans to build a 2-GW coal-fired power station in the Chiba Prefecture, near Tokyo, saying that the project would not be economically feasible. It is the second coal plant scrapped recently. [CleanTechnica]

Coal plant (Credit: Joel Abroad, via Flickr)

¶ “Granny Smith Gold Mine To Install Renewable Energy Microgrid Onsite” • Gold Fields’ Granny Smith gold mine is set to install one of the world’s largest renewable energy microgrids. It is to be powered by more than 20,000 solar panels, with a total capacity of 8 MW, and backed up by a 2-MW/1-MWh battery system. [Global Mining Review]

¶ “Researchers At University Of Liege Claim Greenland Wind Power Could Help Power Europe” • Researchers at the University of Liège in Belgium say their computer models show wind turbines in southern Greenland could create an abundance of wind energy and feed it into the European grid using HVDC transmission lines. [CleanTechnica]

Katabatic wind in Antarctica (Wikipedia)

¶ “SA’s Big Banks Pull Out Of Funding New Coal Projects” • Reportedly, three of South Africa’s biggest commercial banks have pulled out of funding new coal-fired power projects. This is according to energy expert Chris Yelland, who has reported on the status of these independent power projects over the past several weeks. [BusinessTech]

US:

¶ “WattTime Brings Automatic Emissions Reduction To EV Drivers” • Nonprofit WattTime has automated emissions reduction algorithms that will permit utilities and electricity consumers, including EV drivers, to reduce emissions by shifting flexible power usage to avoid periods when the grid is relying on high emissions sources. [CleanTechnica]

At work (Credit: WattTime)

¶ “ReVision Energy Merger Expands Its Reach In NH And Vermont” • ReVision Energy announced that it plans to merge with Energy Emporium of Enfield, NH. The merger positions ReVision Energy, which completed a number of solar projects in the Upper Valley in New Hampshire and Vermont, for further growth in the region. [Mainebiz]

¶ “Vineyard Passes Muster With Massachusetts” • The 800-MW Vineyard Wind offshore wind farm off the US east coast has passed the Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act review process, enabling it to proceed with state, regional and local permitting. The review process allowed the company to hear the concerns of stakeholders. [reNEWS]

Block Island wind project (Deepwater Wind image)

¶ “Penn State: Powered By The Sun” • Lightsource BP and Penn State announced development of a 70-MW offsite solar system to support the University’s Strategic Plan, which cites stewardship of the planet’s resources as a key priority. The project will provide 25% of Penn State’s state-wide electricity requirements. [Penn State News]

¶ “Lawmakers Seek Support For Nuclear Bailout Bill” • Two Pennsylvania representatives circulated co-sponsorship memos asking their colleagues to join them in supporting forthcoming legislation to amend Pennsylvania’s Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard so it will include nuclear energy as an alternative source. [StateImpact Pennsylvania]

Three Mile Island

¶ “A Draft Plan From Puerto Rico’s Utility Reveals A Huge Shift Towards Solar Power” • A draft version of the 2019 integrated resource plan from the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority shows renewable energy is increasingly appealing for the island. The IRP lays out a proposal for Puerto Rico’s electrical grid over the next twenty years. [ThinkProgress]

¶ “A Look Inside Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station Before Its Reactor Goes Quiet” • Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station in Plymouth, Massachusetts, is one of the worst performing power plants in the country. It is scheduled to shut down permanently in four months. For security reasons, only a few people besides employees have been inside. [WCAI]

Have a rollickingly mirthful day.

geoharvey is free and without ads.
Donate with PayPal
geoharvey is not tax-deductible.
Or visit To Help Support George’s Work.
 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: