January 9 Energy News

January 9, 2019

Opinion:

¶ “Colorado Could Save $2.5 Billion by Rapidly Shutting Down Its Coal Power Plants” • According to PacifiCorp, which owns 22 coal plants in Colorado, its own analysis shows 13 of the 22 plants are currently losing money. Analysis commissioned by the Sierra Club showed that it would be cheaper to replace 20 of the 22 plants with windpower. [Vox]

Coal-burning power plant (Shutterstock image)

¶ “The Economic Viability of Nuclear Power Is Only Going Down” • Last year the Trump administration’s DOE announced that it was launching a media campaign to counter what an official called “misinformation” about nuclear power. Since then, we have not noticed an upsurge in pro-nuclear news – because there is none to report. [Environmental Working Group]

Science and Technology:

¶ “Perovskite Solar Panel Tested on Sanska Building in Warsaw” • The first building-integrated field test of a perovskite solar panel, made by Saule Technologies, has begun in Warsaw, with a projected 5¢/kWh levelized cost of energy. The pilot was made by ink jet printing the PVs. Commercial scale production is hoped for by 2021. [CleanTechnica]

Screen shot of Saule event

World:

¶ “Solar Power in The Netherlands Grows 50% in 2018 – With More to Come” • The production of solar power grew by 50% in the Netherlands last year. The share of renewables in the country’s electricity use rose from 15% to 17% compared to the year before. The share of renewables in total energy use rose from 6.6% to 7.3%. [CleanTechnica]

¶ “Vestas Finished 2018 with Record Wind Turbine Orders over 12 GW” • Danish wind turbine manufacturing giant Vestas Wind Systems A/S made sixteen turbine order announcements between December 27, 2018 and January 1, 2019 for a grand total of 1,771 MW in six days. They bring the sales total for the year close to 13 GW. [CleanTechnica]

Prototype Vestas V164, with a capacity of up to 10 MW

¶ “UK Unveils Small-Scale RE Lifeline” • In its consultation, ‘The future for small-scale low-carbon generation,’ the UK energy department said its new Smart Export Guarantee would compensate small generators for the value of the electricity exported to the grid. Remuneration would be available to systems up to 5 MW in capacity. [reNEWS]

¶ “Solar to Push Gas out of Chile’s Top 3 Power Sources in 2019” • Solar PV power will reach a 9.4% share in Chile’s power mix in 2019, replacing natural gas as the third most important source of electricity in the country, behind coal and hydropower, Chilean nonprofit energy watchdog Coordinador Electrico Nacional has estimated. [Renewables Now]

CVE Chile 45-MW PV plant

¶ “More Cracks Found in Hunterston Nuclear ” • EDF Energy now estimates that there are 370 major cracks in the graphite core of reactor three of the Hunterston nuclear plant in North Ayrshire and 200 cracks in the core of reactor four. Both reactors are currently off line, and pressure is mounting to keep them from restarting. [The Ferret]

¶ “India’s Renewable Energy Capacity Addition to Grow 50% This Year on New Tenders” • Indian growth in renewable energy generation capacity, including solar and wind, is likely to increase by 50% to 15,860 MW in 2019, with improved tender activity. Solar capacity addition is expected to exceed 10,000 MW for the first time. [ETEnergyworld.com]

Wind farm

US:

¶ “Ambitious New York City Bill Aims to Replace Gas-Fired Power Plants with Renewables” • A top councilman for New York City is preparing to introduce a bill mandating that the city come up with a plan by the end of the year to phase out nearly two dozen gas-fired power plants and replace them with renewable sources of electricity. [HuffPost]

¶ “New Hampshire Eager to Join Northeast Offshore Wind Club” • New Hampshire Gov Sununu has requested that the federal government set up an intergovernmental offshore renewable energy task force for the state to facilitate coordination between federal, state and local governments regarding commercial leasing proposals. [Renewables Now]

Offshore wind farm (Beverley Goodwin, CC-BY 2.0 generic)

¶ “Duke Energy Florida Brings Massive Hamilton Solar Power Plant Online” • The 74.9-MW Hamilton Solar Power Plant in Jasper, Florida, is operating, Duke Energy said. The plant will produce enough power for over 20,000 homes at peak production. Duke is moving to install or acquire 700 MW of solar power in Florida through 2022. [Solar Builder]

¶ “AEP Plans 1.2-GW Wind Push” • AEP subsidiary Southwestern Electric Power Company issued a request for proposals for 1,200 MW of wind projects. They must be at least 100 MW and be operating by 15 December 2021. Projects must also be located in the Southwest Power Pool regional grid in Arkansas, Louisiana, Texas, or Oklahoma. [reNEWS]

Farm and wind farm (Pixabay image)

¶ “Land That Once Grew Sugar Cane Now Provides Renewable Energy for Kauai” • The Kauai Island Utility Cooperative is halfway to reaching their renewable energy goals, thanks to a new 28-MW solar farm in Lawai with 100-MW/500-MWh of storage. It is the state’s largest solar-plus-utility-scale-storage power facility. [Hawaii News Now]

¶ “Wind Deal May Allow Holy Cross Energy to Reach Renewables Goal Early” • Colorado’s Holy Cross Energy may reach its goal of providing 70% renewable energy nine years ahead of schedule. In a deal with energy wholesaler Guzman Energy, HCE will develop a new wind farm that will bring it to nearly 70% renewables by summer of 2021. [Aspen Times]

Have a wholly copacetic day.

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