December 27 Energy News

December 27, 2018

Opinion:

¶ “Climate Change: Huge Costs of Warming Impacts in 2018” • Extreme weather events linked to climate change cost thousands of lives and caused huge damage throughout the world in 2018, says Christian Aid. The charity’s report identified ten events that cost more than $1 billion each, with four costing more than $7 billion each. [BBC]

Agricultural loss (Getty Images)

World:

¶ “PCRET Installs 562 Micro-Hydro Power Plants” • The Pakistan Council of Renewable Energy Technologies installed 562 micro-hydro power plants with a total capacity of 9.7 MW during the last five years, electrifying more than 80,000 houses. It installed 155 small wind turbines also, electrifying 1560 houses, and it installed 4016 biogas plants. [The Nation]

¶ “1.7 Million People Have Signed a Petition in Favor of Suing France over Climate-Change Inaction” • More than 1.7 million people have signed a petition in favor of suing the French government for inaction on climate change. Four NGOs have initiated legal proceedings saying France has defaulted on its environmental obligations. [Quartz]

Demonstration in France (Piroschka van de Wouw | Reuters)

¶ “Shell Set to Double Renewable Budget” • Royal Dutch Shell says it will double investment in low-carbon energy to $4 billion a year while it looks to spend $1-2 billion annually on renewable energy within the next 24 months. Shell has been subjected to activist shareholder pressure for years, especially from one Dutch investment group. [Energy Reporters]

¶ “Global Coal Demand Set to Remain Stable Through 2023 Despite 2018 Increase” • Global coal demand is expected to rise for a second year in a row in 2018. The International Energy Agency believes growth in India and Southeast Asia will be offset by declines in Europe and North America, leaving demand somewhat stable through 2023. [CleanTechnica]

Transporting coal in Indonesia

¶ “Chinese ‘Party Offshore'” • Chinese company State Power Investment Corp brought a 72-turbine offshore wind farm online off the coast of Jiangsu Province. The 302.4-MW Dafeng project is located 43 km from Yancheng City, according to local media reports. It took 202 days to build and will generate 870 GWh of electricity per year. [reNEWS]

¶ “Spain’s power 40% renewable in 2018” • In Spain, the share of renewables in power generation is estimated at 40% this year, up from 33.7% in 2017, thanks to wind farms and increased output from hydropower. Data from grid operator Red Electrica de Espana for 2018 showed that wind’s share was 19.8%, just behind nuclear’s 21.4%. [Renewables Now]

Spanish wind park (Santi Villamarín, CC-BY-2.0, NoDerivs)

¶ “China Starts Operating Most Powerful Single Nuclear Reactor” • China has completed and is now operating an advanced french designed EPR nuclear reactor with 1750 MW of power. This is the most energy from a single nuclear reactor. The main design objectives of the new EPR design are increased safety and competitiveness. [Next Big Future]

US:

¶ “Ørsted Receives 20-Year PPA Approval from Connecticut Regulators” • Ørsted US Offshore Wind announced last week that its 200-MW Revolution Wind Connecticut offshore wind farm, off the coast of that state, has received approval from State regulators for its 20-year Power Purchase Agreement with two state utilities. [CleanTechnica]

Block Island wind farm

¶ “Mercury Emissions From Power Plants Drop 81.7%” • Mercury emissions from power plants fell 81.7% from 2011 through 2017, after establishment of the EPA Mercury and Air Toxics Standards, data from the Center for American Progress shows. Acting EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler is considering rolling back key standards elements. [Daily Energy Insider]

¶ “Ultra-Fast Chargers Come to California” • The Porsche Taycan (formerly Mission E) cars will be arriving shortly. They will be able to take advantage of ultra-fast chargers now being installed in California. The new 350-kW charging equipment can provide a properly equipped electric car with 240 miles of driving range in just 30 minutes. [CleanTechnica]

EVgo 350 kW fast charge station

¶ “After Back-to-Back Hurricanes, North Carolina Reconsiders Climate Change” • After North Carolina was hit by two major hurricanes within two years and flooding rainfall from a third, the state that once spurned the science of sea level rise in its zoning rules is starting to take climate change more seriously. It also has a new governor. [InsideClimate News]

¶ “Ormat Adopts Hybrid Solar+Geothermal Tech” • Ormat Technologies is adding solar energy to a geothermal plant to raise efficiency and to boost income from the energy off-taker, Southern California Public Power Authority. The 18-MW PV installation will cover the 24-MW geothermal plant’s operational energy consumption. [CleanTechnica]

Ormat Technologies geothermal plant

¶ “Minnesota Power Expands Wind Power Portfolio” • The Minnesota Public Utilities Commission approved Minnesota Power’s 20-year purchase agreement with Tenaska Inc, for 250 MW of wind-generated electricity, tentatively from the Nobles 2 wind farm, expanding the utility’s wind portfolio to 870 MW capacity. [Daily Energy Insider]

¶ “Where Does Your State Get Its Electricity? The NYTimes Knows.” • Using Energy Information Administration data, the New York Times created a graphic representation of how America generates electricity, comparing today’s energy mix to what it was in 2001. Graphs show the shift away from coal power and the rise of natural gas. [CleanTechnica]

Have a really nice day.

geoharvey is free and without ads.
Donate with PayPal
geoharvey is not tax-deductible.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: