November 27 Energy News

November 27, 2016

Opinion:

¶ “Science under threat in Trump’s ‘post-truth’ world” • The ‘post-truth’ world is fertile land for science sceptics from climate change deniers, anti-vaccine groups to evolution sceptics. Given the rise of fake social media news, standards of truth are even more important. Deborah Blum is a Pulitzer Prize winner, and a trained scientist. [Irish Independent]

Floody hell: Climate change is a concern,  but so is everyday regulation in the US. (Photo: Lorraine Teevan)

Floody hell: Climate change is a concern, but so is
everyday regulation in the US. (Photo: Lorraine Teevan)

Science and Technology:

¶ Scientists are creating a bio­diversity map identifying thousands of aquatic species in rivers and streams in the Western United States. The map eventually will include everything from insects to salmon to river otters. It’s possible because of new technology that can identify stream ­inhabitants by analyzing DNA in water samples. [The Register-Guard]

World:

¶ Following the removal of sanctions, Iranian energy demands are starting to increase, particularly from heavy industry, and this means output from renewables is expected to grow. The country’s renewables body is looking to attract $10 billion of direct private investment by 2018 and $60 billion by 2025. [Renewable Energy Focus]

Wind turbines in northwestern Iran (Shutterstock image)

Wind turbines in northwestern Iran (Shutterstock image)

¶ Swiss citizens are voting in a referendum to determine whether their country shuts down its nuclear power plants by 2029. Polls suggest a tight race. Switzerland gets about 33% of its electricity from nuclear power, around 60% from hydroelectric power and little more than 4% from renewable sources like wind and solar. [Deutsche Welle]

¶ As the Christmas festive season approaches, Finland’s chemical industry is urging people to support a campaign to turn left-over cooking fat into fuel. The campaign, called “Kinkkutemppu,” which means “ham trick,” will collect leftover cooking fat from Finnish households and convert it into renewable diesel fuel. [Market Business News]

Roasting a turkey produces enough grease to power an  average family car through 2 miles. (Image: pixabay-23178)

Roasting a turkey produces enough grease to power an
average family car through 2 miles. (Image: pixabay-23178)

¶ COP22 lacked the glamour of the achievements of last year’s Paris agreement. National governments seemed most concerned with fast-tracking rules. But businesses, regional governments, and cities have stepped up with plans and initiatives to address climate change, moving to a low carbon and climate resilient future. [ETEnergyworld.com]

¶ In Vietnam, many investors have been ready to take part in the solar power industry but they are waiting for specific regulations from the Government to set prices. The relevant agencies have suggested a solar power price of 11.2¢/kWh to 13.2¢/kWh, which is attractive enough to attract investors to renewable energy. [VietNamNet Bridge]

Solar array at a primary school (Photo: Van Nam)

Solar array at a primary school (Photo: Van Nam)

¶ Awareness of climate change and how to help sustain the environment will soon be taught in classrooms across the UAE, authorities announced. Curricula may include learning about sustainability, and school children will be shown how to take energy-saving measures. The program will include children of all ages. [gulfnews.com]

US:

¶ Recently, researchers from Carnegie Mellon University calculated the carbon footprint of Thanksgiving dinners, had every year on November 24, and published their findings for different states in the US. The meal-footprint is lowest in Vermont (0.09 kg of carbon dioxide released) and highest in West Virginia (36. 3 kg). [The Wire]

Food has its own carbon footprint  (Credit: diametrik/Flickr, CC BY 2.0)

Food has its own carbon footprint
(Credit: diametrik/Flickr, CC BY 2.0)

¶ Two former Indiana mayors are pressing the state to move to cleaner energy and emerging energy technologies that have not been favorably received so far by Indiana lawmakers. More than three-fourths of Indiana’s electricity generation is fueled by coal, and nine of the state’s 10 largest power plants are coal-fired. [Fort Wayne Journal Gazette]

¶ President-elect Donald Trump may want to cut environmental regulations, but the Tennessee Valley Authority is still moving away from coal. The federal utility got more than two-thirds of its electricity from burning coal two decades ago, but it expects to get a bit less than a quarter of its power from coal next year. [Chattanooga Times Free Press]

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