July 14 Energy News

July 14, 2016

World:

¶ Work on a hydroelectric turbine at Otley Weir in Yorkshire began last November but was seriously hampered by high river levels and the Boxing Day floods. Now, the project is back on track, as two Archimedes screw turbines, each the length of a single-decker bus and nearly twice as wide, have been lifted into place. [Wharfedale Observer]

One of the two huge Archimedes screws being installed at Otley Weir.

One of the two huge Archimedes screws being installed at Otley Weir.

¶ Beothuk Energy Inc is proposing six offshore wind farms in Atlantic Canada with a combined 4,000 MW of clean, green, renewable power. It has signed a memorandum of understanding with Iron and Earth, a worker-led group with a mandate to provide oil and gas workers with the training for jobs in the clean energy sector. [Western Star]

¶ Taiwan’s Environmental Protection Administration approved an assessment for developing offshore wind energy. The government has pledged to have 20% of the nation’s electric power generated renewably by 2025 to replace nuclear power. Wind power is expected to make up about 40% of that. [The Maritime Executive]

Chinese white dolphin

Chinese white dolphin

¶ Italy has 22 old fossil-fuel power plants to sell, and Amazon.com may be interested. Enel SpA, Italy’s biggest utility, plans to close 13 GW of power stations fired by coal, natural gas, and oil. Rather than razing them, Enel looking for developers to turn the sites into shopping malls, medical facilities, or high-tech business sites. [Bloomberg]

¶ The South Australian Government has been forced to ask a power station to produce more energy because some of the state’s biggest businesses faced temporary shut downs in the face of wild fluctuations in electricity prices. The issues contributing to the problem include delays to an upgrade of an interconnector with Victoria. [ABC Online]

Port Augusta's coal power station closed in May.

Port Augusta’s coal power station closed in May.

¶ Ontario regulators have given the green light to a 100-MW wind project by Samsung Renewable Energy and Pattern Development. The North Kent 1 project will have 36 Siemens SWT-3.2MW-113 turbines with a 99.5m hub height. It is the fifth and final wind farm in Samsung’s 1069-MW wind power portfolio in Ontario. [reNews]

¶ Climate change campaigners around the world, including in Liberia, are urging a global shift away from fossil fuel to renewable energy, which is generated from the sun, wind, water, and even garbage, just to name a few potential sources. Liberian homes and businesses are beginning to turn away from diesel fuel for power. [Front Page Africa]

Emma’s Fashion is perhaps the most noticeable building at VOA Junction on the Roberts International Airport highway.

Emma’s Fashion is perhaps the most noticeable building at
VOA Junction on the Roberts International Airport highway.

¶ Leading battery companies LG Chem, Panasonic, and Tesla were successful in the initial pilot round of the Australian Capital Territory’s program to install 36 MW of battery storage. The next round is pending, and there are 17 bids competing for 5 places to deliver 2 MW across 600 homes and businesses. [Seeking Alpha]

¶ Vancouver-based Portable Electric is working on replacing diesel generators with PVs and batteries. The 2-kWh VoltStack Mini can power a small sound system or portable kiosk for up to 20 hours. The 55-kWh VoltStack Boss has enough juice to light up a festival stage or movie set. And they can be recharged by PVs. [The Province]

Mark Rabin, CEO of Portable Electric, shows off the 2-kWh VoltStack Mini, a two-kilowatt battery unit. [PNG Merlin Archive] Barry Calhoun / Vancouver Sun

Mark Rabin, CEO of Portable Electric, shows off a 2-kWh VoltStack Mini,
a 2-kW battery unit. [PNG Merlin Archive] Barry Calhoun / Vancouver Sun

¶ A Japanese court has turned down a class action lawsuit seeking damages from nuclear plant makers Toshiba, Hitachi, and GE over the Fukushima meltdown disaster, the plaintiffs, one of the companies, and a report said. Under Japanese liability law, nuclear plant providers are usually exempt from damage claims. [The Sun Daily]

US:

¶ State leaders hope Kansas will be known for more than just its wheat crop. The state is one step closer to that goal with the construction of the new Kingman Wind Energy Center. Governor Sam Brownback joined others in a ceremony to sign a 150-foot wind turbine blade that will soon be spinning over the Kansas plains. [WIBW]

Signing a wind turbine blade at the Kingman Wind Energy Center.

Signing a wind turbine blade at the Kingman Wind Energy Center.

¶ A bipartisan senate bill aims to establish investment tax credits for various types of energy storage in commercial applications and for residential battery storage. For commercial energy storage applications of at least 5 kWh, the bill proposes the same tax incentive as is currently available for solar. [SeeNews Renewables]

¶ Utah lawmakers began drafting legislation to allow them to block the state’s participation in California’s proposed regional electrical grid. A unified grid, the latest studies say, would be a big boon for the environment and for California’s economy. But Utah could see increased carbon emissions in the early years. [Salt Lake Tribune]

PacifiCorp's Huntington coal-fired power plant could be producing more power and emitting slightly more carbon if the utility is an early joiner of a proposed regional electric grid. (Al Hartmann | The Salt Lake Tribune)

PacifiCorp’s Huntington coal-fired power plant could be producing more power and emitting slightly more carbon if the utility is an early joiner of a proposed regional electric grid. (Al Hartmann | The Salt Lake Tribune)

¶ A report from GTM Research analyzed rate structures of 51 US utilities to assess economics of commercial electric storage management. Its data show commercial energy storage economics are currently attractive in seven US states, and are expected to increase in attractiveness over the next five years to 19 states. [CleanTechnica]

¶ Wyoming Governor Matt Mead visited a former coal mine that now produces green energy. Mead met Rocky Mountain Power officials at the former Dave Johnston Coal Mine near Glenrock, which now hosts the first wind project in the US to have been built on a reclaimed coal mine. [KCWY 13 Where News Comes First]

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