March 7 Energy News

March 7, 2016

Opinion:

Australian coal v renewables: how much will it cost to bring electricity to India’s poor? • The Australian government continues to claim that coal from such sources as Queensland’s Galilee Basin will play a vital role in bringing cheap energy to developing nations. But is that really the case? [EconoTimes]

Renewables could be a better answer to India’s power problems.

Renewables could be a better answer to India’s power problems.

Lessons from Fukushima • Five years on, the 3/11 master narrative is still under construction. The response to the triple disaster in 2011 showed the world the best of Japanese society: orderly, humane and resilient. It also exposed the governance deficit, and that needs to be fixed. [East Asia Forum]

Is the Hinkley Point C nuclear plant project about to unravel? From the outside looking in, EDF’s bid to build a nuclear power station at Hinkley Point in Somerset seems to lurch from the ludicrously improbable to the absurd. Given typical overruns at Hinkley, EDF would be in trouble. [ITV News]

Science and Technology:

¶ Researchers from the Quantum Wave Microscopy Unit at Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University published a proposal for a submerged marine turbine that could harness the energy of the Kuroshio Current, an ocean current in the North Pacific Ocean. [CleanTechnica]

Ocean turbine proposed by Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology

Ocean turbine proposed by Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology

World:

¶ Daimler AG will put €500 million into the creation of a second lithium-ion battery production facility in Germany, according to recent news from the company. The facility will produce lithium-ion batteries to be used in electric vehicles and hybrids under the Mercedes-Benz brand. [CleanTechnica]

¶ In the survey about plans for Japan’s future energy policy conducted before the fifth anniversary of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, 44.6% sought cuts in Japan’s dependence on nuclear power and 21.0% requested the eventual abolishment of nuclear power generation. [Japan Today]

¶ Japan’s prime minister revealed a plan to make Fukushima Prefecture a center for development of hydrogen technology. Facilities will be developed in the prefecture to fuel 10,000 fuel-cell cars by 2020. The hydrogen would be generated by renewable energy. [The Japan News]

Nunobiki Plateau Wind Farm. Photo from Nunobiki Wind Farm. CC BY-SA 2.0. Wikimedia Commons.

Nunobiki Plateau Wind Farm. Photo from Nunobiki Wind Farm. CC BY-SA 2.0. Wikimedia Commons.

¶ Myanmar’s Ministry of Electric Power signed a wind power deal with China Three Gorges Corporation last week. The two parties signed a memorandum of agreement for a wind turbine project in the Chaungtha area of Ayeyarwady Region, which will generate 30 MW of electricity. [Myanmar Times]

¶ The Federal College of Agriculture in Akure, capital of Nigeria’s Ondo State, is ready to support farmers seeking help to use gasses from cow manure to generate renewable energy. It will help bridge the gap in power shortage with biogas technologies in rural and semi-urban areas. [The Nation Newspaper]

¶ Wind power generation in Scotland was enough to meet 41% of the country’s entire electricity needs for the month of February, WWF Scotland said today. Scotland’s wind turbines supplied 929,417 MWh of electricity last month, enough to power 109% of Scottish households. [SeeNews Renewables]

Wind farm in Scotland. Author: Neil Williamson. License: Creative Commons, Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic.

Wind farm in Scotland. Author: Neil Williamson. License: Creative Commons, Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic.

¶ The nuclear disaster has cost Japanese taxpayers almost $100 billion despite government claims TEPCO is footing the bill, according to calculations by the Financial Times. Almost five years after the disaster, the figure shows how the public have shouldered most of the disaster’s cost. [CNBC]

US:

¶ One of the reactors at the Oconee Nuclear Station was shut down after a fire and explosions damaged a transformed on site. The operator declared the incident “unusual” but emphasized there was no threat of radiation release. Emergency crews contained the fire. [RT]

¶ A NOAA study shows that by building new high-tech transmission lines, the US could cut energy sector global warming emissions by 80% within 15 years, while keeping consumer costs low and meeting increased demand. The idea came from studying the national weather map. [PRI]

High-voltage direct current transmission lines could help transfer electricity over long distances much more efficiently and make renewable energy more viable. Credit: Chris Hunkeler/Flickr

High-voltage direct current transmission lines could help transfer electricity over long distances. Credit: Chris Hunkeler/Flickr

¶ Rooftop solar and distributed energy champions have advanced a ballot initiative to restore Nevada’s retail-rate net metering policy. However, they are facing legal challenges from a utility-backed PAC. If nothing else, a lot of time and money will be spent on this challenge. [CleanTechnica]

¶ SUN DAY Campaign, a non-profit focusing to sustainable energy, says the renewable energy (biomass, geothermal, hydropower, solar, wind) growth in the US has been promising, but the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has failed in their forecasts on the industry. [Greentech Lead]

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