February 2 Energy News

February 2, 2016

World:

¶ Collaborating with Ecotricity, the Royal Society For Protection Of Birds installed a new wind turbine at RSPB Headquarters at the Lodge. A 100-meter wind turbine will deliver 1.85 million kWh per annum. The Director of Conservation says research shows the turbine is not in an area where birds will be endangered. [CleanTechnica]

For the Protection of Birds

It’s windpower for the Royal Society For the Protection of Birds

¶ It was a good year for renewable energy in China, global research and consulting firm GlobalData said. China helped push global renewable installed capacity to an estimated 913.48 GW in 2015, leading the way in annual capacity additions for solar, biopower, small hydropower, and onshore wind. [CleanTechnica]

¶ Collapsing oil prices, Japan’s return to nuclear power, and market uncertainty in China are among the short-term challenges for liquefied natural gas. But longer-term competition from renewable energy in Europe and Asia might pose the biggest challenge, according to a new Brattle Group analysis. [Business in Vancouver]

The liquefied natural gas carrier Grand Aniva. Photo by VladSV / Shutterstock

The liquefied natural gas carrier Grand Aniva. Photo by VladSV / Shutterstock

¶ The UK’s government has made it a “top priority” to ensure protections for national parks and sites of special scientific interest do not obstruct fracking across the country, according to a leaked letter from ministers. It appears they are trying to see that what limited protections exist do not get in the way of fracking. [The Guardian]

¶ Banco Santander SA is considering investing in the UK’s rooftop solar market, despite deep cuts to feed-in tariff subsidies coming into effect next week. The UK government will cut solar feed-in tariffs for new projects by as much as 64% and cap new installations in a bid to keep a lid on renewable energy subsidies. [Bloomberg]

¶ According to its annual report NATO plans to increase its investment in renewables and energy efficiency as they “reduce the risk” to troops involved in conflict. Between 2003 and 2007, an estimated 3,000 soldiers were killed or wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan, transporting fuels to power military bases. [EcoWatch]

NATO plans to increase its investment in renewables and energy efficiency as they “reduce the risk” to troops involved in conflict. Photo credit: Pew Environment

NATO plans to increase its investment in renewables and energy efficiency to reduce the risk to troops. Photo credit: Pew Environment

¶ Not far from the shores of Lake Huron, 91 wind turbines have begun pumping 180 MW of clean energy into the Ontario’s power grid. Samsung Renewable Energy Inc and Pattern Energy Group announced the Armow Wind power facility is now producing enough power for about 70,000 homes. [CanadianManufacturing.com]

¶ Dutch Transmission System Operator TenneT and its Danish counterpart Energinet.dk have signed contracts with Siemens and Prysmian for the construction of the COBRAcable between the Netherlands and Denmark. Siemens will supply two converter stations. Prysmian will supply the DC cables. [Marine Technology News]

Prysmian Group cableship Giulio Verne during loading operations in Arco Felice (Naples, Italy) Image: TenneT

Prysmian Group cableship Giulio Verne during loading operations in Arco Felice (Naples, Italy) Image: TenneT

US:

¶ The US Supreme Court ruled in favor of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, deciding that demand response should be regulated at the federal level and ensuring that the demand response industry can continue its impressive progress. Demand response was a $1.4 billion market in the US in 2015. [CleanTechnica]

¶ Lockheed Martin has entered into a 17-year power purchase agreement for solar-generated electricity produced by Duke Energy Renewables. The renewable power purchase is expected to produce 30 MW (about 72,000 MWh per year). It will provide clean energy for all Lockheed Martin domestic business segments. [Power Online]

Duke Energy Renewables solar facility in Conetoe, North Carolina. Photo: courtesy of (C) Aerophoto America (PRNewsFoto/Lockheed Martin)

Duke Energy Renewables solar facility in Conetoe, North Carolina. Photo: courtesy of (C) Aerophoto America (PRNewsFoto/Lockheed Martin)

¶ California’s participation in a growing network of power utilities and operators in the western US called the Energy Imbalance Market has yielded savings of $12 million in the fourth quarter of 2015, state power officials said Monday. Those savings are expected to be passed onto customers. [Sacramento Bee]

¶ The US House of Representatives passed the Electrify Africa Act, after nearly two years of trying to get the measure through both chambers of Congress. It now goes to the president for his signature. The bill will help millions of people in sub-Saharan Africa gain access to reliable electricity. [Big News Network.com]

Transmission lines. Reuters photo.

Transmission lines. Reuters photo.

¶ Maine has New England’s biggest pipeline of wind projects in the works, and developers of nine projects have asked for long-term contracts with utilities in Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island. The projects altogether would add another 2,140 MW, about 3.5 times Maine’s current capacity. [Bangor Daily News]

¶ Wind power has hit an important milestone in America, with 980 working wind installations generating 70 GW of renewable electricity. According to the American Wind Energy Association, that’s enough to power 19 million typical American homes or drive 26 million electric cars all the way around the world. [EarthTechling]

Image credit: under CC license

Image credit: under CC license

¶ New York lawmakers are proposing policies that they hope can save struggling upstate nuclear power facilities from closing. Two senate bills would use state money to keep the plant open. One would the owner Entergy a $60-million corporate tax credit to cover its losses at the FitzPatrick plant. [WRVO Public Media]

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