January 24 Energy News

January 24, 2016

Science and Technology:

¶ Lake Poopó is more than 12,000 feet above sea level on Bolivia’s semi-arid Andean plains. Even though the lake has dried up before, according to experts, this time the recovery will no longer be possible. “This is a picture of the future of climate change,” a glaciologist says. (The lake’s area was about 250,000 acres.) [Laurel Leader Call]

Fishing boats on what was once Lake Poopó's shore.

Fishing boats on what was once a shore.

World:

¶ Based on research done by Stanford University, led by Mark Z. Jacobson, The Solutions Project is popularizing the maps and plans. It has created infographics highlighting which future energy mix will theoretically be the best to achieve the zero-emission target for each of these 139 countries. [CleanTechnica]

¶ Swiss battery manufacturer Leclanché has been selected by Hecate Canada Storage II, LLP to deliver a 13-MW/53-MWh system. Leclanché will team with Deltro Energy Inc on the project. It will stand as one of the largest grid ancillary storage services systems in North America. [CleanTechnica]

Emission-free grid stability via Deltro

Emission-free grid stability via Deltro

¶ Alberta is looking at changing regulations so people who generate their own wind or solar electricity can earn money selling the excess electricity back to the grid. Sinking oil prices have prompted the Alberta government to look at diversifying the economy to lessen its dependence on oil and gas revenues. [CBC.ca]

¶ The government of Bangladesh has set a target to generate 2,000 MW renewable energy by 2021, up from the current generating capacity of 405 MW. The new target of renewable energy would be 10% of the total electricity generation in 2021 and would increase to 20% in 2030. [Financial Express Bangladesh]

¶ Fuel supplies to landlocked Nepal have been blocked for months at the Indian border, initially by protests over a new constitution. Now, Nepal is suffering rolling power cuts for up to 14 hours a day. The government has turned to renewable power sources, mainly solar and wind, for a solution. [Nikkei Asian Review]

Solar panels on the roof of the offices of the Alternative Energy Promotion Centre in Kathmandu (Photo by Deepak Adhikari)

Solar panels on the roof of the offices of the Alternative Energy
Promotion Centre in Kathmandu (Photo by Deepak Adhikari)

¶ A broken submarine cable and a drought have left Tasmania with electric supply problems. Stakeholders point out that Tasmania is one of the best places in the world to harvest wind, hydro and solar energy. The Environment Minister said the government would consider adding renewable power. [Tasmania Examiner]

¶ Ecotricity introduced the concept of making green gas from grass in Britain early last year and if the company’s application to Winchester City Council is accepted, the Green Gas Mill will pump £3 million into the local economy every year for twenty years. It would also power 4,000 homes. [Renewable Energy Focus]

¶ The Philippines is now the largest and fastest-growing producer of electricity from wind power among the 10 countries belonging to the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, a former Senator said in a news release. Its coastlines and mountains give the country very rich wind resources. [InterAksyon]

Wind farm in Bangui. Photo from tourism.gov.ph

Wind farm in Bangui. Photo from tourism.gov.ph

¶ The Japanese government has used taxpayer money to provide over ¥16.2 billion ($136.34 million) in subsidies to local governments for promoting so-called pluthermal power generation using mixed oxide fuel (MOX). The project is a key part of the country’s nuclear fuel cycle policy. [The Japan Times]

US:

¶ This week voters in the village of Hyde Park and the town of Stowe each approved building community-based solar projects. Once online, the projects will help the small municipal electric departments meet the new renewable energy standards Vermont passed into law last year. [Vermont Public Radio]

Blue skies over the Village of Hyde Park are a welcome sight for a community that just approved a 1-MW solar project. Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Blue skies over the Village of Hyde Park, a welcome sight for a community that just approved a 1-MW solar project. Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

¶ Within the next two years, construction will begin to convert six dams along the Muskingum River, in Ohio, to hydropower. The six sites will provide an average of 4 MW of power, which is sufficient to power more than 2,000 homes. Converting the six dams will cost about $118 million. [Zanesville Times Recorder]

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