December 8 Energy News

December 8, 2015

COP21:

¶ After lower-level negotiators at the Paris climate talks delivered a drafted agreement that left all crunch issues unsolved, foreign and environmental ministers stepped in. Warning that “the clock is ticking towards climate catastrophe,” UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon told ministers the world expects more than “half-measures.” [The Weather Channel]

Demonstrator at the Global Climate March on Nov. 29, 2015 in Berlin, Germany. John MacDougall/AFP/Getty Images)

Demonstrator at the Global Climate March on Nov. 29, 2015 in Berlin, Germany. John MacDougall/AFP/Getty Images)

¶ A group of mayors from cities around the world have published a letter calling on other mayors and cities to follow suit in divesting from fossil fuel investments. The letter was signed in conjunction with the COP21 Climate Summit for Local Leaders, which is being held in Paris alongside the United Nations climate negotiations. [CleanTechnica]

¶ A group of 44 individual states and regions took the COP21 spotlight with an announcement pledging their own carbon goals through The Compact of States and Regions. This is regardless of what their home countries settle on. Later this week, more than 200 US legislators will launch a climate pledge of their own. [CleanTechnica]

¶ Plans submitted ahead of the COP 21 climate talks indicate that the US, China, India, the EU, Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico and Japan will double their renewable energy supply by 2030, according to an analysis by World Resources Institute. Renewable generation will grow from a total 9,000 TWh (in 2009), to 20,000 TWh by 2030. [EarthTechling]

Image Credit: Oimheidi via Pixabay under Creative Commons Licence

Credit: Oimheidi via Pixabay under Creative Commons Licence

¶ The renewable energy industry can stand on its own without subsidies, providing other power companies also forego their own support, the chief executive the world’s largest wind turbine company has told CNBC. Anders Runevad, CEO and president of Vestas criticised the subsidies the fossil fuels industry continued to garner. [Yahoo7 News]

¶ Carmaker BMW and soft drinks producer Coca Cola Enterprises are among the latest companies pledging to source all of their electricity from renewable energy sources as they join The Climate Group’s RE100 initiative. The pledges were announced during the COP21 climate talks, where IKEA is showcasing the campaign’s success story. [edie.net]

¶ An African initiative should see the continent greatly increase its renewable energy over the next 15 years. The African Renewable Energy Initiative plans to develop at least 10 GW of new renewable energy generation capacity by 2020, and at least 300 GW by 2030, potentially making Africa the cleanest continent. [The Guardian]

Solar panels on sale in a market in the northern Malian city of Gao, 2013. Photograph: John Macdougall/AFP/Getty Images

Solar panels on sale in a market in the northern Malian city of Gao, 2013. Photograph: John Macdougall/AFP/Getty Images

World:

¶ Officials of the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy recently revealed that the Indian Government is considering increasing the solar Renewable Purchase Obligation target of 3% by 2022 to 10%. Currently, the RPO target is 15% by 2022, including at least 3% from solar power, with the balance contribution from non-solar sources. [CleanTechnica]

¶ European coal emissions must fall three times faster than they are if the region is to meet its climate goals, according to a new report. Models created by the International Energy Agency suggest that European coal emissions must fall on average by 8% annually until 2040. They have fallen by 2.3% each year over the last nine years. [CleanTechnica]

¶ MHI Vestas Offshore Wind has signed a contract with offshore operator Esvagt to use a new purpose-built service vessel for maintenance of more than 100 MHI Vestas turbines off the Belgian coast. With the upcoming construction of the 165-MW Nobelwind project, a new vessel was needed, in addition to one already in service. [SeeNews Renewables]

New vessel to support MHI Vestas projects. Source: ESVAGT

New vessel to support MHI Vestas projects. Source: ESVAGT

¶ UK owners of polluting diesel generators stand to make “sky-high” profits under a government energy regime that slashed subsidies for wind and solar. They could be awarded subsidies of up to £434 million in the capacity market, up from £109 million last year, and this could trigger a “rapid proliferation” of diesel farms. [The Guardian]

US:

¶ Appalachian Power plans to add up to 150 MW of wind power to its renewable energy portfolio. In a regulatory filing, the company says it plans to issue a request for proposals from bidders in February 2016. The company will seek proposals to purchase wind power assets or to buy electricity generated by wind power projects. [Parkersburg News]

¶ Senator Bernie Sanders released his ambitious plan for climate change, a problem he pointedly says is being perpetuated by the “billionaire fossil fuel lobby.” The plan reads like an ecological wish list. It would US carbon pollution by 40% by 2030 by such measures as putting a tax on carbon and cutting subsidies for fossil fuels. [Washington Post]

Bernie Sanders. Photo by Gage Skidmore. Public Domain Pictures

Bernie Sanders. Photo by Gage Skidmore. Public Domain Pictures

¶ Michigan’s two biggest power companies are up against both lliberal Democrats and conservative Republicans over what they pay customers for electricity from solar panels. Environmental Democrats and Tea Party Republicans have joined forces to promote choices for customers and alternative energy. [The Detroit News]

¶ Every year, Lazard Associates publishes its Levelized Cost of Energy Analysis on different types of power plants including wind, solar, natural gas, coal, nuclear and other technologies. Their analysis shows wind energy and solar power are more affordable than ever. In fact, they beat fossil fuels, even without federal incentives. [Clean Energy News]

One Response to “December 8 Energy News”


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: