November 15 Energy News

November 15, 2015

World:

¶ Sri Lanka will build a final large scale hydro power plant at an estimated cost of $60 million, the Minister of Power and Renewable Energy said. The proposed hydro power plant will be constructed on the Seethawaka River and will add 20 MW to the national grid. The project will be developed as a mini-hydro plant. [Colombo Page]

View of the Randenigala Dam and its spillways from downstream. Rantembe, Sri Lanka. Photo by Rehman Abubakr. CC BY-SA 4.0. Wikimedia Commons.

View of the Randenigala Dam and its spillways from downstream. Rantembe, Sri Lanka. Photo by Rehman Abubakr. CC BY-SA 4.0. Wikimedia Commons.

¶ Portugal’s EDP and Spain’s Gestamp Wind were among the companies awarded contracts to build and operate wind farms in Brazil. The contracts were for 20 wind farms with a combined capacity of 929.3 MW, and 33 solar plants with a combined capacity of 548.2 MW. All must be operational within two years. [Latin American Herald Tribune]

¶ Britain will no longer pursue green energy at all costs and will instead make keeping the lights on the top priority, energy secretary Amber Rudd, will vow this week. The energy department is understood to be considering announcing a closure date for Britain’s remaining coal plants, replacing them with gas and nuclear. [Telegraph.co.uk]

¶ It has been revealed that Coal India, which is state-run, would invest ₹60 billion ($910 million) to set up 1,000 MW of solar power units over the next five to six years, according to the Economic Times, an Indian business newspaper. The government has set a target of generating 100 GW of solar power by 2022. [The National]

A solar power microgrid in the village of Dharnai in Bihar. Prashanth Vishwanathan / Bloomberg

A solar power microgrid in the village of Dharnai in Bihar. Prashanth Vishwanathan / Bloomberg

¶ A record oil glut is set to continue into next year, maintaining pressure on prices. According to the International Energy, stockpiles stand at a record three billion. The report follows disappointing eurozone growth figures and a slump in commodity prices on the back of weaker demand from China, all of which sent stock prices lower. [BBC]

¶ France plans to go ahead with a global climate change summit in Paris at the end of the month, Prime Minister Manuel Valls said Saturday, despite a wave of deadly attacks on Friday night that killed nearly 130 people in the capital. The conference “will be held because it’s an essential meeting for humanity,” Valls explained. [The Japan Times]

US:

¶ A new $25 million plant under construction in North Carolina will convert turkey waste into industrial steam for energy. Prestage AgEnergy is being built off NC 24 in the rural community of Moltonville. It will use 55,000 tons of turkey litter a year to produce the equivalent of 95 million kilowatt hours of electricity. [Fayetteville Observer]

Turkey. Photo by Malene Thyssen. CC BY-SA 3.0. Wikimedia Commons. 

Turkey. Photo by Malene Thyssen. CC BY-SA 3.0. Wikimedia Commons.

¶ Connecticut’s push to bring more natural gas into the state to heat homes and produce electricity is drawing fire from environmentalists, who say an expansion in pipeline construction means declining focus on renewable energy. The Algonquin pipeline, which runs from Danbury to Putnam, is a target of their protests. [CT Post]

¶ Bernie Sanders opened Saturday night’s Democratic debate by vowing to rid the world of ISIS. Following up, the moderator pointed out that during a debate last month, Sanders had identified “climate change” as the greatest threat to national security and asked whether he still believed that. “Absolutely,” replied Sanders. [Grist]

¶ A warming Arctic climate and lengthening summer growing season in recent decades have led to changes in vegetation on Alaska’s North Slope, extending the habitat of wildlife like snowshoe hares and moose farther north than they were seen previously, according to a study in Global Change Biology. [Fairbanks Daily News-Miner]

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