November 9 Energy News

November 9, 2015

World:

¶ Coal consumption is poised for its biggest decline in history, driven by China’s battle against pollution, economic reforms and its efforts to promote renewable energy. Global use of the most polluting fuel fell 2.3% to 4.6% in the first nine months of 2015 from the same period last year, according to a report released by Greenpeace. [The Australian Financial Review]

A woman in China wears a mask to counter pollution. Getty Images

A woman in China wears a mask to counter pollution. Getty Images

¶ As Zimbabwe seeks to boost power generation, it finds the option of hydro-power provides little guarantee for power now and in the future. The 750-MW-capacity Kariba Hydro Power Station is an example, falling to 63% of capacity following just two consecutive drought seasons. Climate change is making hydro power unreliable. [AllAfrica.com]

¶ The first turbine at Zuidwester wind farm in the Netherlands started operation. Along the shore of the IJsselmeer, RWE Innogy replaced 50 older models with 12 of the world’s largest onshore wind turbines with a capacity of 7.5 MW each. Each of the new turbines can generate as much electricity as all 50 turbines of the old ones combined. [Sun & Wind Energy]

¶ South Korea’s leading battery-maker LG Chem said it has secured a deal worth millions of dollars to supply its batteries for a project to build the world’s largest energy storage system for frequency regulation in Germany. The company’s lithium-ion batteries will be used for frequency regulation in Nordrhein-Westfalen and Saaerland in 2016. [The Korea Herald]

¶ China has changed course and emerged as a leader in curbing greenhouse gas emissions six years after it was accused of obstructing the last high-level climate talks in Copenhagen. Beijing “recognizes it should take a different responsibility than a few years ago,” said Li Shuo, senior climate officer for Greenpeace East Asia. [Himalayan Times]

Wind turbines are built on a hill along a highway near Jiamusi, in northeastern China’s Heilongjiang province on July 30, 2015. Photo: AP

Wind turbines are built on a hill along a highway near Jiamusi, in northeastern China’s Heilongjiang province on July 30, 2015. Photo: AP

¶ A majority of the UK public backs subsidies for renewable energy, according to a report. It says around 83% of over 2,000 people surveyed support subsidies for wind and solar. The support for coal is at 23%, and for nuclear power it is 33%. The UK Government is planning to scrap support for renewables. [Energy Live News – Energy Made Easy]

¶ Vestas has won a firm and unconditional order for turbines totaling 200-MW from Inner Mongolia Hanas Wind Power for two Chinese wind power projects. Under the deal, the Danish power equipment manufacturer will deliver 75 of its V110-2.0 MW and 25 of its V100-2.0 MW models. Commissioning is to be in the second quarter of 2016. [Power Technology]

¶ Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power held a ceremony Monday to mark the official operation of two reactors at its New Wolseong Nuclear Power Plant in Gyeongju. The New Wolseong No 1 and No 2 reactors are each capable of generating 7.9 billion kWh of electricity annually. The No 1 reactor began producing power in 2012, and the No 2 in July. [Korea Times]

US:

¶ More Wisconsin farmers are letting the sun shine in – by bringing solar photovoltaic systems into their farming operations. Incentives and the falling prices of hardware have helped shorten return on investment periods for solar installations. Still, changes in net metering policies could reduce payouts to producers for the excess power they create. [Agri-View]

A 20 kWh solar panel system is installed on the south side of Han Breitenmoser's free-stall barn.

A 20 kWh solar panel system is installed on the south side of Han Breitenmoser’s free-stall barn.

¶ Legal professionals are warning that ongoing investigations of ExxonMobil practices could drag other oil businesses. The firm is the subject of controversy over allegations it mislead the public about climate change. But prosecutors are thinking about investigating all businesses that chose to fund organizations that promoted climate change denial. [California Turkish Times]

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