October 25 Energy News

October 25, 2015

World:

¶ In Norway they use Teslas as taxis. Norwegians have the highest per capita ownership of the prestige plug-in. Taxi driver Trond Gustav Somme has owned his Tesla for the past two years, trading up from a Nissan Leaf. Mums and dads are also opting for a Tesla instead of a big Volvo; not only is it cooler, it’s cheaper. [New Zealand Herald]

Trond Gustav Somme with his Tesla taxi. Photo / Grant Bradley

Trond Gustav Somme with his Tesla taxi. Photo / Grant Bradley

¶ The Kyoto Prefectural Government signed an agreement with Alaska to explore the possibility of importing liquid natural gas. While there are financial and bureaucratic challenges to face before Alaskan LNG flows to Kyoto, the agreement is a step to achieve a larger goal: ending prefectural dependence on nuclear power by 2040. [The Japan Times]

¶ The government of Pakistan is taking necessary measures to develop renewable energy and a number of projects involve collaboration of the private sector. There are 30 wind power projects with 1760 MW capacity being developed, along with 31 solar projects with 999.6 MW and over 1500 MW of biomass power in the works. [Radio Pakistan]

¶ The UAE and New Zealand signed an agreement to develop a jointly-funded 1-MW solar PV power plant in the Solomon Islands. The power plant will meet seven percent of the Solomon Islands’ energy needs and reduce CO2 emissions by over 1,200 tons while saving over approximately 450,000 litres of diesel annually. [ArabianBusiness.com]

King Solomon Hotel in Honiara, capital of the Solomon Islands. Photo by Phenss. CC BY-SA 4.0. Wikimedia Commons.

King Solomon Hotel in Honiara, capital of the Solomon Islands. Photo by Phenss. CC BY-SA 4.0. Wikimedia Commons.

¶ At least 12 cities in five countries have pledged in their Intended Nationally Determined Contributions to shift to 100% renewable-power sources to help fight climate change as early as this year. Four of the cities are in the US, one is in Canada, five are in Sweden, one is in Denmark, and one is in Norway. [Business Mirror]

US:

¶ A planned 400-MW pumped hydro storage project in Montana could provide electricity when there are lulls in solar and wind power production. The project might be completed in 2017, and has support from Montana’s governor. Montana has wind resources to be the number three state for wind generating in the US. [CleanTechnica]

Image Credit: PD-US Gov-Interior-FWS

Image Credit: PD-US Gov-Interior-FWS

¶ Less than two years after Vermont almost quadrupled the amount of renewable power that customers could sell back to their electric utilities, at least one utility has reached the cap. Vermont’s largest utility, Green Mountain Power expects to reach the net-metering cap of 15% of their peak load by early next year. [Rutland Herald]

¶ An ordinary looking irrigation canal in west-central Colorado has become a small pivot in the great national debate about what our future energy system should look like. What it should be is small, decentralized power production from primarily renewable sources such as is proposed for the South Canal near Montrose. [The Denver Post]

A power developer proposes to harness the power of tumbling water in a canal, to produce 990 kWh of electricity, or enough for 1,445 people. (Allen Best, Special to The Denver Post)

A power developer proposes to harness the power of tumbling water in a canal, to produce 990 kWh of electricity, or enough for 1,445 people. (Allen Best, Special to The Denver Post)

¶ Local farmers in California may have to return to the polluting practice of burning their agricultural waste in the open air unless the state Legislature acts soon to subsidize struggling biomass power plants that run on such material, the executive director of the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District warns. [The Bakersfield Californian]

¶ Forty-two years and counting. That is how long it has taken to get America’s latest nuclear reactor up and running. The stop-start saga behind Unit 2 at the Watts Bar complex near Knoxville, Tennessee, moved a step closer to its conclusion on Thursday when the NRC granted the plant a 40-year operating license. [BDlive]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: