August 30 Energy News

August 30, 2015

Opinion:

¶ “Climate Change and Nuclear Power: You Don’t Cure the Plague by Spreading Cholera. Nuclear Radiation is not the Solution to Global Warming” In the lead-up to COP21, there is more than one petition to leave the fossil fuels in the ground. But some appeals back nuclear power, in some cases by failing to mention it. [Center for Research on Globalization]

World:

¶ Technological advances mean businesses no longer need to choose between economic growth and climate stability, said former UN secretary-general Kofi Annan. Mr Annan told people at an event: “There is no such trade-off, we can have both… What is required is a will.” He noted the progress already made in renewable energy. [AsiaOne]

Former UN secretary-general Kofi Annan said technological advances mean businesses no longer need to choose between economic growth and climate stability. Reuters

Former UN secretary-general Kofi Annan said technological advances mean businesses no longer need to choose between economic growth and climate stability. Reuters

¶ A community-owned organisation in north-eastern NSW is set to take on the big guns in electricity supply through a $4 million initial public offering to fund a renewable energy retailing and solar company it hopes will stimulate local renewable energy projects across the country. Enova Energy hopes to capture customers from the local utility. [Sydney Morning Herald]

¶ Construction of the first solar power plant in Vietnam began recently in Mo Duc district, central Quang Ngai province, with capital of $37.17 million and a capacity of 19.2 MW. The solar power plant will be built on an area of 24 hectares and use solar photovoltaic technology from Thailand. It is expected to come into operation in mid-2016. [VietNamNet Bridge]

¶ In Australia, a new report says that batteries may transform the energy sector, reducing dependence on fossil fuels. It said it would cost only about $4.2 billion (Aus) to have batteries with capacity to deliver 10% demand across the energy grid at peak times. The question is, who should own the batteries, consumers or utilities? [The Australian Financial Review]

¶ New South Wales has the highest level of greenhouse gas emissions in Australia and does not have a renewable energy target. Only 6% of its electricity is from wind, solar and water. By comparison, Tasmania uses 95% renewables. New South Wales used to be ahead of the pack when it came to renewable energy. [ABC Online]

The Nyngan solar plant. Photo supplied: AGL

The Nyngan solar plant. Photo supplied: AGL

¶ The Department of Energy and Petrochemicals has released a new solar policy for the Indian state of Gujarat which aims to scale up solar power generation to 10 GW by 2020. The policy aims to achieve targets sustainably while encouraging investors for large-scale solar projects, but emphasizing solar rooftop systems as small as 1 kW. [CleanTechnica]

¶ Vattenfall has produced first power at the 49.5-MW Kentish 2 offshore wind farm in the southeast of England. The company said the milestone export to the National Grid was reached at 14:05 local time on Saturday. Two of the 15 MHI Vestas V112 3.3-MW turbines are now producing power with the remaining 13 “to follow shortly”. [reNews]

US:

¶ According to the US EPA, 77% of Massachusetts’ greenhouse gases came from power plants in 2013, a decrease from the 85.2% in 2010. That is attributed, in part, to the rise of less-expensive natural gas as a primary fuel source and less reliance on nuclear power and coal as fuel. The shift has been going on since 2000. [Wicked Local]

Kevin Thornton, a spokesman for Exelon, leads a tour of the power company's existing Summer Street plant in Medway earlier this summer. Daily News Staff Photo/Allan Jung

Kevin Thornton, a spokesman for Exelon, leads a tour of the power company’s existing Summer Street plant in Medway earlier this summer. Daily News Staff Photo/Allan Jung

¶ Among the things the White House announced last week is a $1 billion increase in loan guarantees for renewable energy projects, $24 million in new grants for solar research and measures to reduce costs for homeowners to install solar panels. Fossil fuel and utility interests argue that the matter should be left to the free market. [Rapid News Network]

¶ A few years ago, New Jersey Governor Christie and others laid out a vision: acres of giant wind turbines, rising like a modern flotilla in the Atlantic, their white blades spun by ocean gusts, generating clean renewable energy just beyond the horizon at the Jersey Shore. But New Jersey’s offshore wind energy appears to have stalled. [NorthJersey.com]

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