June 29 Energy News

June 29, 2015

World:

¶ The first prototype wave power unit in the Australian state of Victoria is ready to be installed off its south-west coast later this year, with its builders saying it could be the start of a “new era” for renewable energy. The $21-million project is expected to provide 250 kWh of renewable energy annually. [ABC Online]

Victoria's first prototype wave power unit will be deployed in November. (BioPower Systems Pty Ltd)

Victoria’s first prototype wave power unit will be deployed in November. (BioPower Systems Pty Ltd)

¶ Australian economist and climate change advisor Professor Ross Garnaut pointed out that the costs associated with stranded assets are already greater than the costs associated with action on climate change. This was part of a rather direct attack on the economic policy that Australia has taken in recent years. [CleanTechnica]

¶ BMW is still pursuing its plan to convert all of its various model platforms to electric drivetrains (this includes range-extending engines and plug-in hybrids, of course) over the next decade or so, according to recent reports. Even the company’s top-selling 3 Series sport sedans will be plug-in hybrids. [CleanTechnica]

¶ Genesis Energy Corporation, based in London, and SHP Malthe Winje, based in Norway, have signed a memorandum of understanding for Modular Mini Hydro Power that could efficiently and effectively meet Nigerian and other African energy needs quickly and with no negative environmental impact. [THISDAY Live]

¶ In Ethiopia, the 153-MW Adama wind farm has opened its doors, making it the largest wind farm in sub-Saharan Africa to date, reports the AFP. The 102 70-metre high Chinese-built turbines are situated in a range of rocky hills in the Ethiopian highlands 100 kilometres southeast of the capital Addis Ababa. [ESI Africa]

Over 75% of Ethiopia’s 94 million people, mainly those living in rural areas, are not connected to the national grid. Photo credit: Adama Wind Farm. AFP

Over 75% of Ethiopia’s 94 million people, mainly those living in rural areas, are not connected to the national grid. Photo credit: Adama Wind Farm. AFP

¶ Vestas has been awarded a firm contract to provide 56 turbines at Latin America Power’s 185-MW San Juan project in Chile. The Danish manufacturer will supply and install V117 3.3-MW machines at the project in the region of Atacama. Deliveries will begin in 2016, and commissioning is due the same year. [reNews]

¶ Westinghouse Electric Company and eight European consortium partners today announced that they have received €2 million in funding from the EU to establish the security of supply of nuclear fuel for Russian-designed reactors in the EU. Five EU member states are operating a total of 18 such reactors. [Digital Journal]

¶ France is soliciting bids from private companies to provide up to 50 MWh of battery storage for its islands and offshore territories in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and for Corsica. More than 3,000,000 live on these islands. The projects will have 500 kWh of storage for every MW of solar power installed. [PlanetSave.com]

US:

¶ Thirteen miles off the coast of Rhode Island, Block Island boasts 17 miles of beaches, 365 freshwater ponds, 250-foot bluffs and 150 bird species. It also has electricity costing 50¢/kWh. Now the island is about to become well known for another reason. It will host the first offshore wind farm in the United States. [GreenBiz]

Old Harbor on Block Island, Rhode Island. Photo by Swampyank at English Wikipedia. Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license. Wikipedia Commons.

Old Harbor on Block Island, Rhode Island. Photo by Swampyank at English Wikipedia. Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license. Wikipedia Commons.

¶ If the EPA’s greenhouse gas regulations take effect as proposed, utilities will move quickly from coal to natural gas, with renewable energy picking up in a few years. The EIA analysis forecasts a decrease of more than 600 billion kilowatt-hours in coal generation by 2025 as a result of EPA’s Clean Power Plan. [Electric Co-op Today]

¶ The EPA’s Regional Haze Rule targets visibility in national parks and wilderness areas and would require retrofitting several Arkansas coal plants with scrubbers reducing sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide. Though the rule is only addresses visibility, proponents of the plan have lauded its health benefits. [Arkansas Online]

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