June 16 Energy News

June 16, 2015

World:

¶ The International Energy Agency suggests we have started to work positively on climate change. Solid global economic growth last year failed to increase in carbon emissions. Renewable power types are expected to overtake coal as the world’s largest source of electricity by 2030. [The Australian Financial Review]

The IEA says renewable energy will overtake coal as the biggest source of electricity supply by 2030.

The IEA says renewable energy will overtake coal as the biggest source of electricity supply by 2030.

¶ Adani Group has signed a joint venture agreement with the Rajasthan Government to set up a 10,000-MW solar park by 2022. This will be the largest such integrated facility in India. Adani Renewable Energy Park Rajasthan Ltd., will have a 50-50 equity partnership with the state government. [Andhra Wishesh]

¶ The UK government has completed a 69.5-MW solar farm, the country’s largest, Solar Power Portal reported. The power plant is located at a Defence Infrastructure Organisation site in Lyneham, Wiltshire. There is still a potential for expansion of the solar farm to a maximum capacity of 86 MW. [SeeNews Renewables]

¶ The Energy and Mineral Resources Ministry of Indonesia is considering increasing the 2016 budget for renewable energy development five times to $824 million. The development of rooftop PV capacity is in particular focus, with solar arrays being planned for government office buildings and airports. [SeeNews Renewables]

¶ The UK is not on course to meets its legally binding target to secure 15% of its energy from renewable sources by 2020, according to a new industry-backed analysis. The Keep on Track! project found that the deployment of green heat and transport technologies will need to accelerate significantly to meet goals. [Business Green]

¶ The EU is estimated to have reached a 15.3% renewables share in gross final energy consumption in 2014, with 25 member states expected to meet their interim targets. The bloc aims at a 20% share by the end of the decade. The report shows that biomass is the most widely used renewable energy source. [SeeNews Renewables]

¶ At Fukushima Daiichi’s No 1 reactor, most or all nuclear fuel inside its pressure vessel has melted through and pooled at the bottom of the containment vessel. In the other reactors that melted down, some fuel is thought to remain in their pressure vessels. Robots will survey conditions to help decide how to proceed. [AsiaOne]

US:

¶ After installing 718 MW of solar capacity in Q1 of 2015, California has become the first US state to surpass the 10,000 MW threshold, a new report shows. California deployed 231 MW of residential, 88 MW of commercial and 399 MW of utility-scale solar plants in Q1 and ended with a cumulative 10,649 MW. [SeeNews Renewables]

Solar park in California equipped by First Solar. Author: Russ Ferriday. License: Creative Commons, Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic

Solar park in California equipped by First Solar. Author: Russ Ferriday. License: Creative Commons, Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic

¶ With $4 billion and a new government office, the White House has unveiled its latest clean energy initiative and cast a new role for the federal government: not only is it a funder of new research, of the latest solar converter or biofuel source, but it is also a market builder addressing a need for new investment. [The Guardian]

¶ The DOE’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory has allocated up to $6.5 million to support five projects helping the US electric grid handle growing amounts of renewables. The projects come under the Integrated Network Testbed for Energy Grid Research and Technology Experimentation initiative. [SeeNews Renewables]

¶ TDI New England announced an agreement with the Conservation Law Foundation. It includes enhanced environmental and public benefits from a project running a 150 mile long transmission line under Lake Champlain, making Vermont part of the development of the New England Clean Power Link. [Rutland Herald]

¶ Throughout the country, there are more than 80,000 dams, primarily used for flood control and irrigation. Today, just 3% are equipped to generate power. But that 3% produces nearly 7% of our electricity. Hydropower has huge potential for increased capacity. But there are problems with permits and licences. [The Hill]

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