April 6 Energy News

April 6, 2015

Recent Articles that Should Not be Missed:

¶ “A Reagan approach to climate change” George Shultz says observations of a changing climate are simple and clear, so he concludes that the globe is warming and that carbon dioxide has something to do with that fact. He says those who say otherwise will wind up being mugged by reality, and he proposes a carbon tax. [Washington Post]

Mountaintop removal mine in Pike County, Kentucky just off U.S. 23. Photo by Matt Wasson, Wikimedia Commons.

Mountaintop removal mine in Pike County, Kentucky just off U.S. 23. Photo by Matt Wasson, Wikimedia Commons.

¶ Coal companies are in trouble because of low prices. They keep pulling coal out of the ground, taking a steady loss rather than one big write-down, in the hope that prices will bounce back. That, of course, is only adding to the supply glut in the US, the world’s second-biggest producer, and driving prices down further. [Bloomberg] (Thanks to Tom Finnell.)

World:

¶ One of the more hilarious criticisms of renewable energy is that it costs too much. A report says the economies of China, the EU, and the US could save as much as $500 billion a year in fossil fuel imports alone if they switched to 100% renewable energy. There would be many other large benefits as well. [CleanTechnica]

¶ One of Scotland’s first-ever solar farms would be erected near a quarry in the town of Wormit, if ambitious proposals are given the go-ahead. The proposal is for a 27-acre solar farm that would generate 4 MW of clean, renewable energy, enough to power around 1360 homes, according to the developer. [Fife Today]

¶ Turkey’s Energy and Natural Resources Minister says the country would add 4,000 MW to its production capacity this year, 95% of which will come from local and renewable resources. The government aims to increase the share of local and renewable sources in electricity production to 30% by 2023. [Daily Sabah]

¶ Egypt is facing a lack of fuel, causing energy shortages that escalate during summer months; the government is often required to cut power at some areas to reduce pressure on the overloaded grid. Solar PVs with 13,900 kW capacity are being built in ministries’ and governmental installations. [The Cairo Post]

¶ The Philippine National Police will go solar as the Department of Energy installs renewable energy generating facilities in some offices inside the police’s national headquarters in Quezon City. The PNP Sports Center and Center for Law Enforcement Studies are sites. The intent is to cut electricity bills. [Inquirer.net]

¶ The UAE Government is planning to build solar power plants with a combined capacity of 100 MW in Northern Emirates at a cost of $136m. The plants will be built in collaboration with the private sector, and are aimed at reducing the cost of energy production and lowering carbon emissions. [Clean Technology Business Review]

US:

Vestas V47-660kW wind turbine at the American Wind Power Center museum of Wind Power in Lubbock. Photo by Diane Turner from Arlington, United States, Wikimedia Commons.

Vestas V47-660kW wind turbine at the American Wind Power Center museum of Wind Power in Lubbock. Photo by Diane Turner from Arlington, United States, Wikimedia Commons.

¶ One of the top utility companies in the US, Pacific Gas & Electric, recently achieved a new milestone with regard to solar energy — the company now has more than 150,000 solar customers connected to the wider electric grid. PG&E currently connects an average of 4,000 new solar customers every month. [CleanTechnica]

¶ Tennessee Valley Authority’s draft Integrated Resource Plan for the next 20 years says under most scenarios TVA would benefit by importing at least 1,750 MW of wind power from Texas and Oklahoma. Clean Line Energy LLC wants to bring about twice that amount to the Tennessee Valley. [Chattanooga Times Free Press]

¶ Leading national companies in North Carolina want more choice and competition when it comes to energy, including where it comes from and who they buy it from. That’s the message recently delivered to the North Carolina legislature in a letter signed by 10 corporate giants in the state. [Energy Collective]

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